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UQx DENIAL101x 1.2.2.1 Consensus of Scientists

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Published on Apr 27, 2015

The overwhelming majority of climate scientists agree that humans are causing climate change. How do we know that? This video covers several studies showing the high levels of agreement about anthropogenic global warming among scientists, and concludes by debunking the infamous "Global Warming Petition Project." Subtitles available in English, Slovenian, Finnish


About Denial101x:

Climate change is real, so why the controversy and debate? Learn to make sense of the science and to respond to climate change denial in Denial101x, a MOOC from UQx and edX. Denial101x isn’t just a climate MOOC; it’s a MOOC about how people think about climate change.

Comments on our channel are turned off. To discuss our videos, enrol at http://edx.org/understanding-climate-... and join us in the edX discussion forum.


References for this video:

Doran, P. T., & Zimmerman, M. K. (2009). Examining the scientific consensus on climate change. Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union, 90(3), 22-23. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10...

Anderegg, W. R., Prall, J. W., Harold, J., & Schneider, S. H. (2010). Expert credibility in climate change. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(27), 12107-12109. http://www.pnas.org/content/107/27/12...

Diethelm, P., & McKee, M. (2009). Denialism: what is it and how should scientists respond?. The European Journal of Public Health, 19(1), 2-4. http://eurpub.oxfordjournals.org/cont...

Kahan, D. M., Jenkins‐Smith, H., & Braman, D. (2011). Cultural cognition of scientific consensus. Journal of Risk Research, 14(2), 147-174. http://climateinterpreter.org/sites/d...

Plous, S. (1991). Biases in the assimilation of technological breakdowns - do accidents make us safer. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 21(13), 1058-1082. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10...

Talisse, R., & Aikin, S. F. (2006). Two forms of the straw man. Argumentation, 20(3), 345-352. http://www.communicationcache.com/upl...

Smith, N., & Leiserowitz, A. (2012). The rise of global warming skepticism: Exploring affective image associations in the United States over time. Risk Analysis, 32(6), 1021-1032. http://www.climateaccess.org/sites/de...

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