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  • Promjena okvira #15 - O reproduktivnim pravima / Reframing #15 - On Reproductive Rights

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    [english subtitles included]
    The fifteenth episode of the educational patchwork broadcast brings a segment on reproductive rights (feat. Mia Gonan, Maya Andrea Gonzalez, Nataša Mihoci and Ana Vilenica), as well as fragments of protest reactions to the so-called 'Walk for Life'

    U petnaestoj bilingvalnoj epizodi emisije „Promjena okvira“ pogledajte prilog o reproduktivnim pravima u kojem se iz historijsko-materijalističke perspektive bavimo politizacijom prava na pobačaj i roditeljstvo, proizvodnjom režima materinstva u kapitalizmu te vezom društvene reprodukcije i reprodukcije kapitala, ograničenim dosegom liberalnih i radikalno feminističkih projekata u kontekstu reproduktivnih pitanja te konzervativnom agendom i naturalizacijom rodnih uloga. O navedenim temama u prilogu govore Mia Gonan, Maya Andrea Gonzalez, Nataša Mihoci i Ana Vilenica. Također, u ovoj epizodi donosimo fragmente prosvjednih reakcija na tzv. Hod za život.

    Epizoda je premijerno prikazana 30.6.2017. na Tv Istra.

    integralni intervjui sa sudionicama:
    http://slobodnifilozofski.c......
    http://slobodnifilozofski.c......

    Emisija je financirana sredstvima Fonda za poticanje pluralizma i raznovrsnosti elektroničkih medija Agencije za elektroničke medije Republike Hrvatske. Show less
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  • Interviews Play all

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  • Promjena okvira / Reframing Play all

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  • SUBVERSIVE FESTIVAL Play all

    Lectures, round tables, workshops and interviews filmed during Subversive film festival 2010-2017
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  • 8. mart i feministička borba za socioekonomsku jednakost Play all

    Povodom Dana žena 8. ožujka 2013. u 17 sati u Dvorani 4 na Filozofskom fakultetu u Zagrebu održala se tribina "Osmi mart i važnost feminističke borbe za socioekonomsku jednakost danas". Na tribini su govorile Jagoda Milidrag Šmid, Dora Levačić, Ankica Čakardić i Davorka Turk uz moderaciju Nikoline Rajković. Organizatori tribine su BRID (Baza za radničku inicijativu i demokratizaciju) i Centar za ženske studije.
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  • Seminar: Nationalism, Populism, and the New Right Play all

    Centre for Labour Studies, Zagreb, Croatia
    November 18-19

    *

    Schedule:

    Saturday November 18

    11.00-12.30 Joachim Becker: The different currents of the nationalist right

    15.30-17.00 Jan Rettig: Nation trumps economy: Performance, interaction and impact of two discourse communities of far right parties across Europe

    17.15-19.00 General discussion


    Sunday November 19

    11.00-12.30 Nikola Vukobratović: The rise of a nationalist Europe?: a Balkans perspective

    15.30-17.00 Irena Pejić: The new far right in post-transitional Serbia

    17.15-19.30 General discussion

    *

    The political landscape of Europe (and beyond) in the years since the financial and economic crisis of 2007/2008 has been marked by the rise of right-wing forces. Public debates around astronomic public rescue packages for private financial institutions and the austerity measures accompanying them did, counter to what many on the left may have expected, not shift public opinion significantly towards left positions. Rather, it was often the populist right that proved increasingly successful in articulating economic and social anxieties into a discourse of conceptually vague anti-elitism combined with xenophobia, aggressive social chauvinism and – especially in the eastern parts of Europe – the reassertion of regressive social norms regarding women's rights and the rights of sexual and ethnic minorities. The outbreak of the so-called "refugee crisis" strengthened this trend, effectively turning the crisis narrative into one of besieged national and cultural identities, threatened by the influx of foreign – predominantly Muslim – populations. The electoral successes of parties such as Front Nacional in France and AfD in Germany signify the increasing normalization of formerly fringe political options within the parliaments of central core countries of the EU.

    Many on the left have interpreted these phenomena as symptoms of the crisis of neoliberal hegemony. But even if we accept this as a broad diagnosis, the question remains as to why these reactions so often take such reactionary forms. Much like the rise of fascism in the interwar period, the current rise of right-wing forces presents a significant challenge to Marxist (or more broadly – materialist) approaches, insofar as these assert the explanatory centrality of class for social and political processes. Current political developments seem to once again drive home the fact that theoretical invocations of class as unifying social category do not necessarily correlate to a unifying experience of class subjects. The fact that the class experience of the crisis and its reverberations has proven to be fractured along "identitarian" fault lines or, at the very least, allowed its political articulation in divisive and deeply regressive terms presents both a theoretical and political challenge the left cannot afford to ignore. The challenge to theoretically come to terms with the rise of a new, aggressive right, entails the challenge of critically reassessing the explanatory instruments of the left, above all the question of the complex relation between structural factors, lived experience and political articulation.

    With the seminar "Nationalism, Populism, and the New Right", the Centre for Labour Studies wishes to facilitate debates on these and related matters in a regional context that is itself marked by the resurgence of aggressive right-wing forces. By providing a platform for critical debate between regional activists and theorists as well as relevant international scholars, we hope to contribute to a both theoretically and politically more adequate response to these worrying processes.
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  • Seminar: Ideology: Its Theories and Critique(s) Play all

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  • Seminar: Class, Class Theory, Class Struggle Play all

    Few concepts developed by Marx and the many theoretical and political currents claiming continuity with his critical project can rival ‘class’ in their distinctive association with Marxism in all its contested plurality. Yet, the widespread consensus on the centrality of the concept for Marxism, shared by both proponents and detractors, is significantly complicated by the persistent disputes over its theoretical content. As a central category in the Marxian/Marxist theoretical arsenal, it remains subject to a wide variety of conflicting interpretations and mutually exclusive theoretical projects. Marx himself failed to provide a systemic treatment of the concept. Notoriously, the discussion of class at the end of Volume III of Capital was left a mere fragment, while the conjunctural analyses presented in political and historical writings such as The Eighteenth Brumaire and The Class Struggle in France raise questions as to their compatibility (or lack thereof) with the systemic development of categories in Capital and other texts of Marx’s mature critique of political economy.

    This seeming lack of coherence facilitated the development of diverging traditions, providing textual footholds for often mutually hostile approaches. The history of Marxism is thus in large part also the long history of disputes between what usually have been called ‘structural’ and more historically founded attempts at tackling the problem, with deep implications for the explanatory status of class and class struggle in Marx’s overall project as well as questions pertaining to political subjectivation, agency (their limits and conditions) and political strategy – all of which remains disputed terrain to this day. To this must be added various attempts to improve on perceived deficits or omissions in Marx’s theory by recourse to other, non-Marxists/non-Marxian theoretical traditions and approaches, amongst which more or less explicitly ‘Weberian’ approaches occupy a privileged position. Predictably, though, the often eclectic and merely additive character of many such ‘innovations’ did not go unnoticed. Rather than overcoming or silencing earlier questions as to the possibility of an internally coherent Marxist class theory, capable of plausibly superseding or bridging the longstanding structural/historical divide, such approaches more often than not amounted to their proliferation and amplification, eventually adding to them the question of the possibility of their coherent integration with various stratification theories.

    While these disputes may be considered to some extent ‘internal’ – arising from fundamentally affirmative approaches to the question of class and its explanatory relevance for contemporary capitalist societies, the rise of ‘new’ social movements and the perceived crisis and limits of older forms of class-based politics since the 1960s resulted in new challenges, often in the form of an outright dismissal of the ‘privileged’ status of class and class politics, in both their explanatory and political-organizational dimensions. The spreading and deepening of the influence of these new theories and the related shifts in political focus on the left – conducted under the banner of a critique and rejection of ‘class reductionism’ (often a mere code-word for Marxism itself) – has placed class-theoretical approaches in a defensive position. Ironically, this radical revision of the core inventory of the conceptual arsenal of the historical left gathered pace at a conjuncture which in retrospect may most plausibly be conceptualized as an intensification of class politics from above in the form of what has often been labeled the neoliberal offensive or ‘counterrevolution’.

    In Eastern Europe, the crisis and collapse of ‘real socialism’ and the subsequent drama of capitalist restoration intensified the predicaments and disorientation of the left, often leading to its wholesale dissolution in favor of an assertive and confident (neo)liberalism, virtually erasing class – considered irredeemably ‘contaminated’ by its association with the legitimizing discourse of the toppled communist regimes – as a subject of theoretical and political concern at the very moment of deep and traumatic shifts in the class composition of these societies.

    This Seminar will try to confront the following (and related) questions: Is there a coherent class theory in Marx? What to make of the cacophonic plurality of class theories within and around Marxism? Can the explanatory centrality of the concept of class for the understanding of contemporary capitalist societies be maintained and coherently argued for? What is the explanatory scope and where lie the explanatory limits of class-based approaches to the understanding of the complexities of capitalist societies? How to approach the vexed problem of political subjectivation and (...)

    http://radnickistudiji.org/?
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  • Seminar: Capital, the State and European Integration Play all

    Organized by: Centre for labour studies (Centar za radničke studije - CRS, radnickistudiji.org)
    Seminar: "Capital, the State and European Integration"
    Location: net.culture club MaMa, Preradovićeva 18, Zagreb, 17-18.10.2014.

    Until not too long ago, even amongst parts of the left, the historic decline of the relevance of the state was taken as a 'given'. Under the umbrella of 'globalization theory' far-reaching proclamations on deep tectonic shifts were the height of fashion. At closer inspection, however, the impatiently sweeping character of many such generalizations more often than not revealed itself to be the consequence of a lack of both conceptual rigor and empirical scrupulousness, embarrassingly echoing much of the imaginary of neoliberalism's triumphalism and its intellectual proponents.

    The onset of the financial and economic crisis of 2007/2008 and its consequences made many of these theoretical constructs seem obsolete over night. Large, coordinated state interventions and rescue packages were the order of the day, pointing to complexities in the relations between states and capital which simplistic end-of-state narratives seemed decisively badly equipped to tackle, let alone explain in any meaningful fashion. In some quarters this then lead to talk of a 'return of Keynes' or, more generally, proclamations of a 'return of the state' itself. But this pendulum swing in the opposite direction proved to be no less superficial and premature than what had preceded it. Rather than leading to a restoration of post-war Keynesianism, the dominant drive of crisis policies reaffirmed a preference for neoliberal solutions, now of an increasingly authoritarian character, devoid of old democratic niceties and former procedural inhibitions. Here too, a complex and often untransparent assemblage of markets, transnational institutions, nation states and their mutual interactions confirmed the deficiencies of much left thinking to adequately account for these processes and the shifting institutional architecture underpinning them.

    Yet without a proper understanding of the contemporary configuration of relations between capital, the state and transnational institutions, it will be impossible to judge the plausibility or implausibility of various competing proposals on the left and their respective strategic projections. Nowhere more so than within the European Union, where deepening integration now assumes the seemingly paradoxical form of deepening socio-economic fragmentation along national lines and a palpable regional polarization into core and periphery. Centripetal and centrifugal forces seem to overlap and intertwine in a complex process with as of yet unclear long-term consequences for the future of the European project itself. The increasingly authoritarian character of 'crisis-resolution' policies pose long-term dangers for the subaltern classes and endanger formal-democratic standards long considered an irreversible historical achievement. In parallel, a new surge of right-wing populism all over Europe seeks to take advantage of the ensuing socio-economic degradation and political disillusionment...

    In trying to address these complex issues, the seminar will revisit fundamental questions on the nature of the capitalist state, the degree of transfer of its prerogatives to EU and transnational institutions, the ensuing 'division of labour' between national and transnational levels, the class character of these processes, their implications for democratic standards, as well as their possible contradictions and future perspectives. The political stakes are clear: only by properly understanding the structural conditions of the current conjuncture, its institutional complexities, inherent limits and contradictions, can viable left strategies be formulated.

    http://radnickistudiji.org/?p=266

    ***

    PROGRAMME

    Friday, October 17th

    11.00 – 12.30
    Lecture
    Jens Wissel: The EU as a New State Project

    15.30-17.00
    Lecture
    John Kannankulam: Competing Hegemony Projects in the Current European Crisis: a Historical Materialist Policy Analysis on Political Struggles

    17.30-19.30
    General discussion

    *

    Saturday, October 18th

    11.00 – 12.30
    Lecture
    Werner Bonefeld: European Economic Constitution and the Transformation of Democracy: On Class and the State of Money and Law

    15.30-17.00
    Lecture
    Bob Jessop: States and State Power: A Strategic-Relational Approach

    17.30-19.30
    General discussion

    ***

    Programme of Centre for labour studies is supported by Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung Southeast Europe.
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  • Radionice /// BRID ||| 2012/2013 Play all

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