This channel mainly features time-lapse imagery from Fuego and Pacaya volcanoes in Guatemala. The Fuego webcam is described here: http://...
This channel mainly features time-lapse imagery from Fuego and Pacaya volcanoes in Guatemala. The Fuego webcam is described here: http://ovfuego-norte.geo.mtu.edu/caminfo.php and the Pacaya webcam is here: http://ovfuego-norte.geo.mtu.edu/ovpac.php.

Dual-camera time-lapse videos

  • Greg Waite
  • 30 videos
  • 197 views
  • Last updated on Apr 7, 2017
The cameras are located at: (left) INSIVUMEH's Fuego Observatory in Panimache, about 7 km southwest of the summit of Fuego; and (right) at La Reunion Golf Resort, about 7 km southeast of the summit. Note that all times are UTC (local time plus 6) and that the times are not perfectly synchronized.

These have been produced through an automated process and have not undergone rigorous quality control.

Fuego is a basalt to basaltic-andesite stratovolcano in the Central American volcanic arc. It has been continuously active since 1999. Typical activity includes dozens of small-scale explosive eruptions each day.

The cameras send images every 10 seconds when the network is available. In low light conditions, the infrared (IR) filter is not used so that wavelengths out to 1000 nm are captured and transmitted. Hot materials emit long wavelengths, so hot emissions dominate the scene.

Fuego is commonly obscured by clouds in the afternoon and into the evening, but more likely to be clear late at night to mid day. During the rainy season (May-September), clouds are more likely.

See: http://ovfuego-norte.geo.mtu.edu for more.
The cameras are located at: (left) INSIVUMEH's Fuego Observatory in Panimache, about 7 km southwest of the summit of Fuego; and (right) at La Reunion Golf Resort, about 7 km southeast of the summit. Note that all times are UTC (local time p...
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