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Electro Motive

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Published on Jan 3, 2013

Harold L. Hamilton and Paul Turner founded the Electro-Motive Engineering Company in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1922. In 1923 Electro-Motive Engineering Company sold two gasoline-powered rail motor cars, one to the Chicago Great Western and the other to the Northern Pacific. Electro-Motive Engineering Company subcontracted the body construction to St. Louis Car Company and the prime mover to Winton Engine Company. The motorcars were delivered in 1924 and worked well, fortunate for the fledgling company, because the sales were conditional on satisfactory performance. In 1925 the company changed its name to Electro-Motive Company (EMC) and entered full-scale production, selling 27 railcars.

Rarely is anyone the absolute inventor of any system, but Harold L. Hamilton probably comes close to being the "father of the diesel locomotive". He was without doubt the diesel-electric's guiding coordinator. Starting his railroading career as a fireman on the Southern Pacific Railroad, he became a locomotive engineer on passenger and freight trains. He eventually became a manager with the Florida East Coast Railway. On leaving railroading for an automotive marketing position in Denver, Hamilton, aware of early electric propulsion experiments, the needs of railroads, and his most recent exposure to heavy vehicles, recognized and integrated the idea of more efficient (over steam) internal combustion power with railroading. Financing himself, he quit his truck sales position, set up shop in a hotel with his partner and a designer, and created a product in 1923 that eventually became the successful version of diesel-electric railway propulsion.
In 1930 General Motors, seeing the opportunity to develop the diesel engine, purchased the Winton Engine Company, and after checking the Winton Engine Company's books, decided to purchase its primary customer, Electro-Motive, renaming it the Electro-Motive Corporation (EMC).[6] Advancing from railcars, EMC began building multi-car diesel streamliners for the Union Pacific Railroad, among others. By 1935, GM felt confident enough to invest in a new factory on 55th Street in McCook, Illinois, west of Chicago, which remains the corporate headquarters. By the end of the 1930s, EMC had a diesel engine powerful and reliable enough for locomotive use.

Source: Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electro-...

Video highlights: S001, Diesel locomotive on the tracks, trains being built, diesel engines, train being designed, High angle train (streamlined)

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