Loading...

Modeling Using 3D Head-Worn and 2D Tabletop Displays

3,915 views

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Uploaded on Jan 5, 2011

Modeling Using 3D Head-Worn and 2D Tabletop Displays

This video documents early work on combining a 2D stationary Microsoft Surface display with a 3D tracked head-worn video-see-through display. It was recorded live, through the head-worn display's built-in camera, for presentation at the Microsoft Research "Going Beneath the Surface" project meeting held at Columbia in December 2009.

Here, the 2D Surface tabletop display shows semi-transparent 2D footprints of simple geometric models, while the 3D head-worn display presents the full 3D models, positioned over their footprints on the Surface. This makes it possible for a user wearing the head-worn display to view the 3D geometric models as if they were physically located on the Surface. (Note that the models extend up and beyond the edge of the Surface, which would not happen if the head-tracked graphics were displayed on the Surface itself.) A user who views the Surface without a head-worn display stll sees the footprints, which are spatially registered with the models. Multi-touch gestures are used to create and edit the models.

The 3D head-worn display (Vuzix iWear VR920 with CamAR) is tracked with the VTT ALVAR optical tracking package, using markers projected on the Surface, which are viewed by the head-worn display's built-in camera. (Other work by our lab on combining the Surface with head-worn displays uses several different approaches to track the head-worn displays; for example, see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaXv57.... )

The research described here was performed by Ohan Oda and Steven Feiner of Columbia University's Computer Graphics and User Interfaces Lab ( http://www.cs.columbia.edu/graphics/t... ). It was implemented with Goblin XNA ( http://goblinxna.codeplex.com ), and supported in part by the "Going Beneath the Surface" program (funded by Microsoft Research and the Surface Team) and generous gifts from VTT and Vuzix.

Loading...

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...