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GREEK PRONUNCIATION 3 (First Epistle of John)

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Published on Dec 24, 2015

A Reading and Pronunciation exercise in Biblical Greek using the First Epistle of John. Reading is intentionally slow in the beginning, then progressively approximates conversational speed while allowing the reader to practice repeating the parts being read. The pronunciation used is that of Neohellenic (Modern Greek). Neohellenic preserves the historical sounds of Greek, so its pronunciation comes very close to the pronunciation of the Κοινή "koine" of the New Testament. For a discussion on the evidence of the historical Greek sounds, collectively referred to as the Historical Greek Pronunciation (HGP), you may visit www.Greeklinguistics.net, or contact the author, Phil Zachariou, at NTGreek@att.net.

For tips on pronunciation, please see a short video clip,
GREEK PRONUNCIATION 4 (Tips) at https://youtu.be/QsKRlzZP3aY.

Note:
The spelling errors we see in private classical inscriptions are repeated in the numerous Hellenistic and Byzantine papyrical records as well as in modern writings by the less literate private citizens. This unbroken 2,500-year-old record of misspellings, judged by the same standard—the same 24-letter alphabet and orthography—is the strongest evidence we have of the development of the historical sounds of Greek. This record helps us follow the phonemic pronunciation of mainstream Greek that prevailed through the centuries over all other peripheral pronunciations and evolved into what it is today. Neohellenic (aka "Modern" Greek) therefore preserves the living historical sounds with a pronunciation that is real, consistent, and euphonic. As the direct descendant of Κοινή, Neohellenic is naturally closer to the pronunciation of the first Greek-speaking Christians than any "reconstructed" or other artificial pronunciation of Greek. —PZ

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