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Rigol DG1000Z Series Function/Arbitrary Waveform Generator Review

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Published on Jul 7, 2015

Rigol DG1062Z: http://toolboom.com/en/Arbitrary-Wave...
Rigol DG1032Z: http://toolboom.com/en/Arbitrary-Wave...
All the new products of Rigol have common design elements and the DG1000Z models are no exception. The basic design elements look similar to those of other products.
The front panel carries the LCD, the power button, the USB storage port, the operation buttons, the 1st and the 2nd output channels and the frequency meter input terminal that is conveniently designed as a separate input terminal. Other waveform generators usually have frequency meter combined with channel 2.
The rear panel holds synchronization terminals, external modulation input for 1 and 2 channels respectively. The reference signal input/output terminal. The LAN terminal that supports LXI technology. The USB port for PC connection. The power input terminal. This device uses static power supply unit, therefore the input voltage may be variable from 100 to 240 Volts. And the grounding connector.
Now we are going to introduce you to the basic functions of the DG 1000Z series generator. Let's turn the generator on. The cooler is automatically turned on to circulate cool air around the device units. Well, now the generator is on.
Let's provide a signal through one of the output channels. Let it be the 1st channel. Using the Channel 1 / Channel 2 switch we are switching between the settings of the 1st and the 2nd channel. The 1st channel is active. For example, I'm sending the sinusoidal signal to the 1st channel output with the frequency of 100kilohertz. Here we have the 1st channel output terminal. Nothing so far. I'm pressing the "OUTPUT" button and we are having the signal. Here we can see the sinusoidal signal with the frequency of 100 kilohertz. The firmware of the generator provides for many signal forms, let's have a look at the basic ones. We have sinusoidal, meander, triangle, impulse, noise and some other available signal forms. Let's pick up a random one. For example, the one like this. Now, let's get back to the sinusoidal.
Also, there are several modulation types. Pressing the "MOD" button and here are the modulation types: the amplitude modulation, the phase modulation and the others. For example let's select the amplitude modulation. Here you can see the amplitude modulation.
Also, the device has SWEEP function, that sets frequency wobbling – it is on instantly. Therefore, the sweep time is 3 seconds. The starting frequency is 100 hertz and the ultimate frequency is 5 kilohertz. Here it is working. And there is also an impulse mode. Now, in fact, we are having the preset cycles mode – in every impulse set the signal has 4 cycles. As you can see there are 4 cycles on the display. You can change the number of the cycles.
The Utilities menu. This menu allows to fine-tune the generator– set the synchronization method, turn the frequency meter on, etc. The following is the "STORE" button. Using this menu you can set the device to saving or reading recorded oscilloscope charts – write to USB storage, read from USB storage, etc. and the inbuilt online help menu where you can scroll through all of the generator's functions and get acquainted in details with all of them.
Whereas the generator has two channels, let’s take a look how it works in 2-channel mode. What I like most is that the two channels of this generator are absolutely identical, they are equal. Sometimes you can find devices where one of the channels underperforms in frequency, inferior in amplitude or has certain modulation limitations, but this device has none of these drawbacks. The both channels are identical and support all of the functions. Let me provide a sinusoidal signal of maximum frequency at the both output channels. For this device the maximum signal frequency is 60 MHz.
Whereas we are having two channels available, both supplied with two harmonic signals, for example, I can show the Lissajous curve. Switching the device to the "X and Y" mode. Here we are having the figure. Due to the phase shift between the signals being equal to zero, we are seeing the line instead of a circle. Should we change the phase, we will obtain a circle-shaped signal, like that. Whereas the frequencies concur, the figure remains stable so that we can set certain frequency difference to make the figure rotate. The figure is rotating. Due to the equal frequency, the figure is circle-shaped. If you change the correlation between the signal frequencies the figure will change too. For example, let's set the 1st channel to the 1 kHz frequency and the 2nd channel to the 3 kHz frequency. As you can see, the figure has changed. Let's also change the frequency of the 1st channel – the figure is frozen because the ratio between the frequencies is divisible – 2:3. If we set a small difference of 2.001 kHz, the figures will start moving.

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