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HowToBasic Oil Change Car

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Published on Jul 24, 2012

The Toyota Corolla is a line of subcompact/compact cars manufactured by the Japanese automaker Toyota, which has become very popular throughout the world since the nameplate was first introduced in 1966. In 1997, the Corolla became the best selling nameplate in the world, with over 35 million sold as of 2007. Over the past 40 years, one Corolla car has been sold on average every 40 seconds. The series has undergone several major redesigns.

The name Corolla is part of Toyota's naming tradition of using the name Crown for primary models: the Corona, for example, gets its name from the Latin for crown; Corolla is Latin for small crown; and Camry is an Anglicized pronunciation of the Japanese for crown, kanmuri.

Corollas are manufactured in Japan and in Brazil (Indaiatuba, São Paulo), Canada (Cambridge, Ontario), China (Tianjin), India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, South Africa, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, the United Kingdom (Derbyshire) and Venezuela. Production has previously been made in Australia (Victoria). Production in the United States (Fremont, California) ended in March 2010.

Ninth generation (E120, E130)

In November 2000 the ninth generation Corolla was introduced in Japan, with edgier styling and more technology to bring the nameplate into the 21st century. It is also called the Corolla Altis in the ASEAN region. The station wagon model is called the (Japanese: Corolla Fielder) in Japan.

Tenth generation (E140, E150)
The tenth generation of the Corolla was introduced in October 2006. Japanese markets called it the Corolla Axio, with the ASEAN markets retaining the Altis branding. The station wagon retains the Corolla Fielder name. The Corolla Altis and Corolla Axio have a different appearance.

The Toyota ZZ engine family is a straight-4 piston engine series. The ZZ series uses an aluminum engine block and aluminum DOHC 4-valve cylinder heads, a first for Toyota. The camshafts are chain driven. The two 1.8 L members of the family, the 1ZZ and 2ZZ, use different bore and stroke. The former was optimized for economy and torque, while the latter is a "square" design optimized for high-RPM power. The ZZ family replaced the extremely popular cast-iron 4A engines.

The seemingly complicated names Toyota gives its engines is actually quite simple. The first number denotes the engine block's generation. The next one or two letters, followed by a hyphen, specify the engine family. The remaining letters following the hyphen list the engine's features. For example, the 2ZZ-GE can be decoded as being the second generation of the ZZ engine series and features a performance head - wide angle valves (G) and Electronic Fuel Injection (E).

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