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⚡️PIPES & DRUMS ♦︎ SCOTS WHA HAE⚡️

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Published on Apr 23, 2015

A view of the amazing Scottish country taken from around Scotland. Many were taken by my friends.
Accompanied by the music Scots Wha Hae by The Pipes & Drums of Leanisch.Music Available @itunes.
I hope you enjoy :))
Scots Wha Hae, or, Robert Bruce’s Address to His Troops at Bannockburnpoem
Scots, wha hae wi’ Wallace bled,
Scots, wham Bruce has aften led,
Welcome to your gory bed,—
Or to victorie.—

Now ’s the day, and now’s the hour;
See the front o’ battle lour;
See approach proud Edward’s power,
Chains and Slaverie.—

Wha will be a traitor-knave?
Wha can fill a cowards’ grave?
Wha sae base as be a Slave?
—Let him turn and flie.—

Wha for Scotland’s king and law,
Freedom’s sword will strongly draw,
Free-Man stand, or Free-Man fa’,
Let him follow me.—

By Oppression’s woes and pains!
By your Sons in servile chains!
We will drain our dearest veins,
But they shall be free!

Lay the proud Usurpers low!
Tyrants fall in every foe!
Liberty ’s in every blow!
Let us Do—or Die!!!
Robert Burns
Scots Wha Hae (English: Scots, Who Have; Scottish Gaelic: Brosnachadh Bhruis) is a patriotic song of Scotland written in the Scots language which served for centuries as an unofficial national anthem of the country, but has lately been largely supplanted by Scotland the Brave and Flower of Scotland.
The lyrics were written by Robert Burns in 1793, in the form of a speech given by Robert the Bruce before the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, where Scotland maintained its sovereignty from the Kingdom of England. Although the lyrics are by Burns, he wrote them to the traditional Scottish tune 'Hey Tuttie Tatie' which, according to tradition, was played by Bruce's army at the Battle of Bannockburn,[1] and by the Franco-Scots army at the Siege of Orleans.
The tune tends to be played as a slow air, but certain arrangements put it at a faster tempo, as in the Scottish Fantasy by Max Bruch, the concert overture Rob Roy by Hector Berlioz, and the Real McKenzies' punk rock rendition on their 1998 album Clash of the Tartans.

  • Category

  • Song

  • Artist

    • The Pipes & Drums of Leanisch
  • Album

    • Pride Of Scotland
  • Licensed to YouTube by

    • INgrooves (on behalf of REL); SOLAR Music Rights Management, and 5 Music Rights Societies

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