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Italy: Rome Metro/Subway, Flaminio station on Line A

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Published on Oct 2, 2012

Italy: Rome Metro/Subway, Flaminio station on Line A
A collection of graffiti covered trains arriving and departing from Flaminio station on Line A of the Rome Metro system. Recorded 7 June 2005.

Rome Metro
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The Rome Metro is an underground public transportation system that operates in Rome, Italy and opened in 1955. There are currently two metro lines, the A line (identified by the orange colour) and the B line (blue). A third line, the green C line is currently under construction. Plans have also been revealed for a fourth line, to be called the D Line. The current network, 45.8 km (28.5 mi) long, has an X-shape with the lines intersecting at Termini Station, the main train station in Rome and encompasses a splitting of the B Line at the Bologna station to reach Rebibbia on one side and Conca d'Oro on the other.
Rome's local transport provider, ATAC, also operates several other rail services: the Roma-Lido line, the Roma-Giardinetti line, and the Roma-Nord line. The first of these, the Rome-Lido railway line, which connects Rome to the sea at Ostia, is effectively part of the metro network. It is run along similar lines to the metro and uses trains similar to those in service on the A and B lines. The Roma-Giardinetti line, although officially designated as a railway, is a narrow gauge tram line, while the Roma-Nord line is a suburban railway.
Line A connects the north-west of the city with the south-east. It currently has 27 stations with terminals at Battistini and Anagnina. Its distinguished by the colour orange.
Approval was given for the construction of the Rome's second metro line in 1959. Subsequently called the A line it would run roughly perpendicularly to the existing metro line, now called the B line.
Works on the A line began in 1964 in the Tuscolana area but were subject to a series of delays caused by poor organisation. Above all, the originally planned method of construction of cut and cover posed serious problems for road traffic in south-east Rome. Work on the metro was suspended and began again 5 years later, using bored tunnels which partially resolved the traffic problems but caused numerous claims for compensation arising for vibrations caused by the machine. Work was also frequently interrupted by archaeological finds made during the excavations, particularly near Piazza della Repubblica.
The A line finally entered into service in February 1980. In the late 1990s it was extended from Ottaviano in Prati to Battistini to the west.
Notwithstanding its name, the B line was in fact the first metro line in Rome. The line B connects the north-east of the city with the south-west. It currently has 25 stations with terminals at Rebibbia, Conca d'Oro and Laurentina. It's distinguished by the colour blue.
The B line was planned during the 1930s by the Fascist government in search of a rapid connection between the main train station, Termini, and a new district to the south-east of the city, E42, the planned location of the Universal Exposition (or Expo), which was to be held in Rome in 1942. The exposition never took place due to Italy's entrance into the Second World War in 1940. When works were interrupted, some of the tunnels on the city-centre side of the metro (between Termini and Piramide) had been completed, and they were used as air raid shelters during the war.
Work on the metro began again in 1948, in concert with works on turning the space, formerly designated for the Expo, into a commercial district under the name EUR. The metro was officially opened on 9 February 1955 by the then President of the Republic Luigi Einaudi. Regular services began the following day.
In 1990 the B line was extended from Termini to Rebibbia to the east of the city and the entire line was modernised. On June, 13 2012 a new 4 km long branch (B1) was opened connecting Piazza Bologna with Conca d'Oro.
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