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you ruined my life 14

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Published on Jun 22, 2012

My patient is a young British man who has suffered all his life from a condition called Intermittent Explosive disorder. This is a chronic behavioral condition, which is characterized by extreme articulations of anger. These outbursts are very often extremely violent, resulting in damage to property, the individual themselves, and, unfortunately, others. It is conjectured that up to 50% of all violent crime is as a result of people suffering from IED.
Along with violence and rageful attacks, the condition features subsidiary afflictions such as kleptomania, pyromania, even addictive behavior such as gambling and drug use. It's most defining characteristic is however, irrational and violent rages, which can be triggered by the smallest event.
I have been studying and treating this condition for 20 years, and have been attacked many times by my patients: I have suffered broken limbs, contusions, a fracturing of my skull; I have even been held hostage at gunpoint. None of these situations, though harrowing and distressing, have deterred me from my aim in treating the many patients who suffer from this debilitation condition.
Five years ago, a young man was referred to me. He had just received a manslaughter and ABH conviction: during an attempted escape from a mental institution he had beaten a guard unconscious and set fire to him. He was found in a disused part of the facility, chanting some strange, savage like language, while dancing around the flaming body. He was shot with a tranquilizer dart, and tasered from a distance, but such was his enraged, adamantine mental state, that these assaults had no effect. It had taken twelve guards to finally subdue him.
From the age of four years old he had been subject to fits of uncontrollable anger. His parents were unable to deal with him, and were compelled to have him institutionalized. He was treated like a common psychiatric patient, and spent his early years and adolescence in a haze of drugs and electro shock therapy. He was released at the age of 18, after having had no violent outbursts for more than a year; but shortly after returning to the outside world, his rages returned, and during and attack of IED, he murdered his own father.
Since this time he has been incarcerated - living in padded cells, so full of tranquilizers that he has little recollection of the past decade.
At this point I started treating him. My treatment is experimental, and so far he is the only patient who is the recipient of my new psychiatric techniques. For two years now he has had no attacks of rage. I have encouraged him to tell his life story, partly to help him understand the condition he suffers from, but also to let others know the true terror and bondage his condition holds him captive in.
This is his video, telling his story: I hope you have enjoyed watching it. Thank you.



My name's James, and i'm a rageaholic. The medical term for my affliction is Rage Disorder, or Intermittent explosive disorder.... well, you can dress it up in any fancy psychological jargon you like, the simple truth is this: I get angry. "Well I get angry too," I hear you saying. Not like me you don't. You ever smashed up your whole house because you dropped your bowl of M&M's, and the damm dog gobbled half of them up before you could kick its ass inside and out of its slobbering mouth? You ever tried to chew through a tree because your beer bubbled over your best pants, screaming at the sky through bloodied, chomping teeth; harried, nail-torn fingers scrabbling on the bark?
My name's James, and i'm a rageaholic... but I will be cured.
I have sought medical help: my psychiatrist is keen on modern techniques, and has encouraged me to focus my anger onto inanimate objects, and let loose my fury!!!

This is just a brief explanation of my treatment - I will soon post a more detailed description of my condition, its prognosis, and as time goes on, its hopeful decline.

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