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Raising a Baby Mouse 1/10 The First Day

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Published on Dec 12, 2010

Warning: for inexperienced animal people the failure rate for trying to handraise a baby mouse is around 75%. It is very painful loosing a baby mouse because you get to love them so much. Think carefully about it before you try.

Warning: Domesticated mice are safe, but wild mice can carry disease. A lot of people keep wild mice as pets and are fine, but it is always a bit of a risk, something you need to be aware of and make a decision over. If you do keep a wild mouse, keep the cage extra clean and wash your hands after handling. With deer mice you may want to wear a surgical mask during cage cleaning.

(If your baby mouse is a deermouse ): deermice in North America can carry a deadly disease, Hantavirus, that they can pass on to humans. Not all deermice have it and the % of those that carry it varies from region to region. Lots of people keep deermice as pets and are fine, but it is always a risk, especially if you have young children, elderly and people with compromised immune systems living in the house.

The First Day

The first day you have your little mouse is very important, especially if it is an orphan. Orphans have often been abandoned for quite a few hours before you find them and so will be cold and dehydrated. You need to get them warmed up (electric heater pad set on low works best) and rehydrated (electrolyte solution for babies is best, or water if you that is all you have).

Matilda was not an orphan, but if I had not come along she would have become frozen snake food. I got her when she was only four days old. I had been hoping for a little older, around 7 days old, but the breeder has none. Fuzzies, little mice who already have hair but do not have their eyes open, are much easier to handraise and you are more likely to succeed. But I am experienced at handraising mice, so I got Mattie as a pinky. I like to handraise my mice because that way they grow up thinking they are human and become the most magical pet, so tiny and yet so trusting and loving.

Warning (If your baby mouse is a deermouse ): deermice in North America can carry a deadly disease, Hantavirus, that they can pass on to humans. Not all deermice have it and the % of those that carry it varies from region to region. Lots of people keep deermice as pets and are fine, but it is always a risk, especially if you have young children, elderly and people with compromised immune systems living in the house.

Music by Michael Joseph Murphy (Emerald Tide)

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