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How to solve PDEs via separation of variables + Fourier series. Chris Tisdell UNSW

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Published on Jun 9, 2009

This lecture discusses and solves the partial differential equation (PDE) known as 'the heat equation" together with some boundary and initial conditions.

The method used involves separation of variables combined with Fourier series. The discussion is in a step-by-step process.

Such an example is seen in 2nd-year mathematics courses at university

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Comments • 115

konataGAMERZ
great lecture! my right ear enjoyed it so much :)
Dr Chris Tisdell
VERY interesting comment about a great combination. Before I became an academic, I was a DJ for 10 years. I used to correspond with Markus (well, the people at Markus' record label, who would send me records every now and then) when he was living in AZ. Boy - hasn't he gone on to do great things!
RenaissanceTheClown
That laugh at 26:00, haha.  This video was fantastic and helped me out a lot with PDE's.  Thank you!
Freddy Dominguez
This video showed me what was barely taught to me in the span of six live lectures
Dr Hesham - Math
thanks a lot DR Chris Tisdell
bigollameo
This is math pedagogy at it's best. What a great teacher!
Moo
⍴c ∂T/∂t = ∂/∂x (k*∂T/∂x) THIS IS THE ONLY SOURCE ONLINE FOR THE CONDUCTION SOLUTION!
Xfactor Chem
At 39:45 shouldn't it be pi/2 on the y axis (f(pi/2)=pi/2) as opposed to just pi?
Chuan'er
Great videos.Love it!!!
huy218
why does F'(L)= sinpi =0 suddenly mean Fn(x)=cosnx ?
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