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Being Innocent isn't Enough, No Justice for CIA Torture Victim El-Masri

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Published on Dec 15, 2010

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Being innocent is not enough to protect you from being tortured, not when you are dealing with a nation which does not uphold the rule of law. And even if they know you are innocent, that's not enough for them to stop violating your rights and release you.
But this is something I want to clarify, this video might lead you to believe he was released once they realized he was innocent but that 's not the case. When they realized he was innocent, they continued to imprison him THEN they dumped him on a back road at night in Albania. Mr. El-Masri's unlawful detention and inhumane treatment continued for two additional months after they knew he was innocent.
CIA agents held him for at least several weeks after his release had been ordered. And the injustices didn't end after he was released, he STILL can't get justice. A Munich court had issued arrest warrants against the CIA agents for complicity in his kidnapping and torture but that was dropped. And thanks to Wikileaks we know why, the US government pressured Germany to drop the case, to not pursue justice , to not allow El-Maseri his day in court.
"... similarity of his name to that of Khalid al-Masri, an Al Qaeda agent linked to the Hamburg cell where the 9/11 attacks were plotted. Despite El-Masri's protests that he was not al-Masri, he was beaten, stripped naked, shot full of drugs, given an enema and a diaper, and flown first to Baghdad and then to the notorious "salt pit," the CIA's secret interrogation facility in Afghanistan. At the salt pit, he was repeatedly beaten, drugged, and subjected to a strange food regime that he supposed was part of an experiment that his captors were performing on him. Throughout this time, El-Masri insisted that he had been falsely imprisoned, and the CIA slowly established that he was who he claimed to be. Over many further weeks of bickering over what to do, a number of CIA figures apparently argued that, though innocent, the best course was to continue to hold him incommunicado because he "knew too much.""
http://harpers.org/archive/2010/11/hb...
"The Washington Post reported that CIA agents, fearing the consequences of releasing him, argued for his continued detention and in fact held him for at least several weeks after his release had been ordered."
http://www.harpers.org/archive/2010/0...
http://www.spiegel.de/international/0...
http://www.spiegel.de/international/g...
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/09/wor...
The media's authoritarianism and WikiLeaks
http://www.salon.com/news/opinion/gle...
http://www.salon.com/news/opinion/gle...
Read Items 1-9 detailing revelations of State Department wrongdoing from the WikiLeaks disclosures:
http://www.salon.com/news/opinion/gle...
Wikileaks and the El-Masri case: Innocent CIA torture victim more than just a leaked cable
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Hh-87...

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