Loading...

Rare Madagascar Tortoise Facing Extinction

2,193 views

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Apr 17, 2009

The distinctive shell pattern and the protrusion underneath its chin are what make the ploughshare tortoise so unique and such a coveted pet. Pet smuggling is a lucrative trade in Madagascar where incomes are low and jobs, especially in rural areas, are hard to find. [Hasina Randriamanampisoa, Durrell Wildlife Trust]: "People from outside, it can be Malagasy people or foreigners, they know that the Ploughshare costs a lot on the black market, then they go to the site around Baly Bay and they try to contact somebody from the local people and they try to convince him to bring them some ploughshare tortoises." Not only tortoises, but other rare animals including lemurs, birds, butterflies and reptiles are threatened by smugglers. To lure locals away from the smuggling business, the country's park authority, ANGAP, began providing tour guides jobs in the national parks. [Rija Ravoninjatovo, ANGAP Eco-Tourism Chief]: "These guides come from neighboring villages, or they are people who have been living here for a long time even if they are not originally from here. It's up to us to help them master the job by training them." 47-year-old Justin Rakotoroa used to hunt forest animals both for profit and pleasure, unaware of the long-term impact on the environment. Now he is a park tour guide. [Justin Rakotoroa, Guide, Ankarafantsika National Park]: "I began to realize that the animals can make money for me. I can earn money guiding the tourists and the visitors through the park. So I have come to respect and protect the park, I have learned to preserve nature." Thanks to his new job, Justin and his wife can now afford to send their children to a private school. Hasina and his colleagues regularly receive tortoise eggs which have been confiscated from smugglers. The eggs need a lot of care and have to be buried and kept at the same angle at all times so that they don't become infertile. 300 tortoises have been born at the park's center over the past 20 years

Loading...

Advertisement
When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...