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Protect Internet from Excessive Regulation

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Published on Feb 17, 2011

I want to really echo what the gentleman from Georgia just did here on the floor of the House he brought some common sense to this debate. Everybody has some talking points and their little notes and they're reading them and trying to confuse the issue, let's take a step back if we might, Mr. chairman.
let's just ask a very simple question. A very simple question: Can somebody name an area in this country or in the world that has had more innovation that has blossomed more, that has opened up communications and connected people more in our country or anywhere in the world in the last decade than the internet? Anybody can name it? Anything? No. It's impossible. Think about what's happened. The internet was even actually given credit for bringing down, helping bring down the government of Egypt. It's allowed people to see the atrocities in Iran. It's allowed things like Facebook and Twitter and iPhones to blossom. It's given access to millions of people and it has created
millions of jobs. So what is the answer, then, for that incredible blossoming? For something that has revolutionized the way we communicate? That the world communicates? What is now the answer of the federal government?
We keep talking about, you know, about letters. It's the federal government. What is the answer of the federal government? To deal with that unprecedented blossoming of innovation, of imagination, of job creation? Oh, Mr. chairman, the federal government now has to regulate. Why - because it's too much innovation, the prices have dropped too much, it's too much imagination, it's too positive. Therefore, the federal government must step in because the federal government can do it so much better. The federal government has all the answers. Mr. chairman, a little bit of common sense. I'm talking to my colleagues here but also to the American people, if you believe and think about 10 years ago, if you believe that the federal government, if it would have been in charge, would have been -- would have done a better job in blossoming this innovation, this job creation, and then you have to be with our friends on the other side of the aisle, you then should support federal government intervening, taking care of, regulating the internet. But if you believe that that miracle of innovation took place because of individuals, of people with imagination, and because the government got out of its way, you would support this amendment. I yield back, Mr. Chairman.

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