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Sweat-Based Glucose Sensing and Transdermal Drug Delivery | Dae-Hyeong Kim | TEDxKFAS

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Published on Oct 29, 2018

A standard protocol for glucose sensing and diabetes treatment involves with frequent and periodic analysis of the blood glucose level and injection of insulin based on the analysis data. However, the repetitive blood collection procedure and insulin shots are highly painful and stressful. One route to detour these issues is to use the sweat-based non-invasive glucose sensing together with the transdermal feedback drug delivery. Physical barriers in the skin have been overcome by using bioresorbable microneedles, and onboard wearable biosensors have analyzed human sweat to estimate the physiological cues and determine the appropriate drug delivery rate. These technological progresses in advanced diagnosis and therapy using the skin-based biosensing and corresponding controlled transdermal drug delivery will provide new solutions to unmet clinical challenges of chronic diabetes management. Dae-Hyeong Kim obtained his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Chemical Engineering from Seoul National University in 2000 and 2002, respectively. He received his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2009. From 2009 to 2011, he was a post-doctoral research associate at University of Illinois. He joined Seoul National University in 2011 and is currently an associate professor in the School of Chemical and Biological Engineering of Seoul National University. He has published more than 90 papers and 25 international and domestic patents. He has been recognized with several awards including George Smith Award (2009), MRS Graduate Student Award (2009), Green Photonics Award (2011), TR 35 award (2011), Hong Jin-ki Creative Award (2015), SCEJ Award (2016), and Young Scientist Award (2017). This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

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