Loading...

Dan Barber: Is the apprenticeship still important?

391 views

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Apr 23, 2012

Its an important maturation process, Barber says.

Dan Barber: I mean I would think . . . You know the age of the . . . What is . . . The Food Network kind of goes in defiance of this like traditional apprenticeship program that I went through, and that it seems to me more chefs . . . more cooks today could really benefit from. Yes. So the answer is ... qualified I think an apprenticeship program . . . The kind that I went through was, you know, in France and kind of hard core . . . is an important maturation process. Hard-core because back then there weren't the rules there are today in the French kitchens. And they were mean places to work and they didn't like Americans. I mean they don't like Americans now, but they didn't like Americans then. You know and the French kitchen of the history, the social dynamic that's involved in . . . in the gastronomical services wherever you are, but especially in the kitchen, is intense. And it takes a lot of discipline and a lot of technique and whatnot, and that's a great place to learn. Spain today is a big one for cooks to go to and get the same sort of inculcation of history of discipline. So yeah I think it's really important.
Recorded on: 2/11/08

Dan Barber: I mean I would think . . . You know the age of the . . . What is . . . The Food Network kind of goes in defiance of this like traditional apprenticeship program that I went through, and that it seems to me more chefs . . . more cooks today could really benefit from. Yes. So the answer is ... qualified I think an apprenticeship program . . . The kind that I went through was, you know, in France and kind of hard core . . . is an important maturation process. Hard-core because back then there weren't the rules there are today in the French kitchens. And they were mean places to work and they didn't like Americans. I mean they don't like Americans now, but they didn't like Americans then. You know and the French kitchen of the history, the social dynamic that's involved in . . . in the gastronomical services wherever you are, but especially in the kitchen, is intense. And it takes a lot of discipline and a lot of technique and whatnot, and that's a great place to learn. Spain today is a big one for cooks to go to and get the same sort of inculcation of history of discipline. So yeah I think it's really important.
Recorded on: 2/11/08

Loading...

Advertisement
When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...