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Look before we burn Walkerville Lyrebirds

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Published on Apr 25, 2014

See the first video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNKaQ... Moratorium on Walkerville Coastal Park being burned and also see www.eclecticparrot.com.au, link and like the Facebook site.

Lyrebirds are completely isolated into likely two populations and could be lost to planned burns. They are continuously scratching and composting on the slopes of the wet gullies of Cape Liptrap Coastal Park and yet to be published research indicates that each bird shifts up to 200t of litter per annum and significant differences in fuel loads in bush with compared to bush without Lyrebirds.

Springs on the ridgelines come from peat beds developed in the soil over millennia. These peat beds maintains wet heath swamps and store water the that maintains creeks and springs that flow to the coast. Burning this bush will likely dry it out, increase dead fuel loads and reduce its capacity to breakdown litter and timber fuels.

However it is vital that research is used o determine the flammability of this bush, its dry solid fuel loads and the likely impact of fire on these fuel loads.

Recent surveys of insects in the Walkerville portion of Cape Liptrap Coastal Park have revealed 'Mallee Moths', oecophorids (said 'ecforid') whose caterpillars eat dead and green leaves in leaf litter in vast amounts. They were among 70 or more species of insects, mostly moths, so far identified. This Coastal park is an ideal place to undertake research into these insects impact on fuel loads, with small patches of several ages in different bush types for comparison.

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