Loading...

EPA and Idaho National Laboratory create first-of-its-scale Water Security Test Bed

187 views

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Apr 26, 2018

NOTE: If you need captions, please click the CC button on the player to turn them on.

Advancing the science and engineering of decontaminating water distribution systems and safely disposing of high-volumes of contaminated water are high priorities for the EPA. To help address these science gaps, EPA homeland security researchers have developed the first-of-its-scale Water Security Test Bed (WSTB).

Water is an important component of everyday life. We rely on safe, clean water for our health and the health of the environment. Protecting this vital resource is critical to living safely and securely. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is responsible for working with water utilities to protect water systems from contamination and to clean up systems that become contaminated. Purposeful or inadvertent distribution system contamination can result in large amounts of infrastructure and water that must be cleaned. Water distribution systems contamination can be caused by, for example, natural disasters such as Superstorm Sandy or by individuals hoping to cause harm.

The WSTB, constructed at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory, replicates a section of a typical municipal drinking water system including a piping system with roughly 445 feet of pipe and two fire hydrants laid out in an “L” shape using 40-year-old, eight-inch cement mortar lined, ductile iron pipes, excavated after twenty years of use for water conveyance. Researchers built the WSTB above ground for easy access during experiments, and to facilitate fast leak detection.

Over the next several years, EPA and partner researchers will conduct experiments using simulants of various biological, chemical, and radioactive materials that simulate high toxic versions of these agents. At this “full” sized system, researchers will demonstrate approaches to contamination detection, sensor and model testing, infrastructure decontamination, water treatment and cyber testing developed at lab and pilot scale. Researchers are also able to verify if laboratory results that were effective in controlled conditions are as effective in full-scale testing. Having the ability to conduct bench scale studies in a real world setting can help address specific research gaps, and help water researchers understand conditions in which real world drinking water systems operate.

Interested in working with EPA researchers at the WSTB, contact hsrp@epa.gov.

For more information, please visit: http://www2.epa.gov/homeland-security...

For more about EPA: http://www.epa.gov/
We accept comments according to our comment policy: https://www.epa.gov/web-policies-and-...

  • Category

  • License

    • Standard YouTube License

Loading...

to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...