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Prof. Philip Maini: Turing's Theory of Developmental Pattern Formation

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Published on May 24, 2012

Turing's seminal paper "The chemical basis of morphogenesis", published in 1952, proposed that pattern formation in early embryonic development was an emergent, or self-organising, phenomenon driven by diffusion. This ingeneous and highly counter-intuitive idea has formed the basis for an enormous number of subsequent studies from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints.

Maini critiques the model, considers applications to skeletal patterns in the limb, animal coat markings, fish pigmentation and hair patterning, and describes how present-day research is still influenced by this paper.

Presented by Professor Philip Maini, Centre for Mathematical Biology, University of Oxford

Recorded on Friday 11 May 2012 at the Informatics Forum, The University of Edinburgh.

The Turing Research Symposium was organised by the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the University of Edinburgh School of Informatics in partnership with SICSA and supported by Cambridge University Press.

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