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The WHITEST city in California (Hint: Also full of liberals)

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Published on Jul 13, 2017

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malibu,...

Ethnic composition

These were the ten cities or neighborhoods in Los Angeles County with the largest percentage of white residents, according to the 2000 United States Census:[63]
Malibu, California, 88.8%
Hidden Hills, California, 88.7%
Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 88.6%
Topanga, California, 87.6%
Beverly Crest, Los Angeles, 87.5%
Westlake Village, California, 85.5%
Manhattan Beach, California, 85.5%
Hollywood Hills West, Los Angeles, 84.9%
Hermosa Beach, California, 84.9%
Fairfax, Los Angeles, 84.7%
2010[edit]
The 2010 United States Census reported that Malibu had a population of 12,645.[64] The population density was 637.7 people per square mile (246.2/km²). The racial makeup of Malibu was 11,565 (91.5%) White (87.4% Non-Hispanic White),[65] 148 (1.2%) African American, 20 (0.2%) Native American, 328 (2.6%) Asian, 15 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 182 (1.4%) from other races, and 387 (3.1%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 769 persons (6.1%).

The Census reported that 12,504 people (98.9% of the population) lived in households, 126 (1.0%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 15 (0.1%) were institutionalized.

Copyright Disclaimer: Citation of articles and authors in this report does not imply ownership. Works and images presented here fall under Fair Use Section 107 and are used for commentary on events deemed newsworthy. Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976 allows for fair use for purposes including criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Section 107 reads in part, "Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright."
https://www.copyright.gov/title17/92c...

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