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rain water catchment

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Published on May 22, 2009

Please read!!! It's amazing how many comments I get telling me this wont work. It's worked for years now. It works perfect and exactly as planned and demonstrated. The following adresses most of the comments I've gotten about how this wont work, or what's wrong with the design. I painted the tanks black after this video to limit algae growth. Tanks can and do fill up from the bottom. Water flows to the lowest point in a system, always, as long as there is a pathway it will take it. Water levels itself, always. There is a screened opening on top of each tank. This keeps the bugs out of the water and lets the air out of the tank. If air can't escape there is no where for water to go into the tank. Too much air pressure will build and push the water back out. There is no way to stack tanks and have the bottoms ones fill up first. You need to leave a vent for the air to escape. (and you couldn't get to the top of the bottom tanks that will leak if you try to plump through the lid) If you fill the tank above the vent opening, then water will pour out of the opening and not travel up to the upper tanks. These tanks, even when empty will hold the weight of a full tank on top of them, no problem, they are designed to do that. You don't want to ever fill the tank all the way up and have the water come out of plumbing in the top vent, it makes the tanks want to become round, it's too much pressure for them. And you'll never get it to not leak at the top cap, it flexes too much between fillings. I've gotten many suggestions filling up the bottom tanks first would be best, it wont work, trust me. My goal here was to capture water as high as I could, without having to build an elaborate stand for the tanks. The tanks weigh a ton each when full. Stacking them uses their built in properties to full advantage. It's best in my Asheville, NC climate to either drain the whole thing in freezing weather, or I've gotten along fine by shutting off the tank valves and draining all the pipes and leaving all the valves in the white pvc pipes open. I've built this the best way it could be done. It has the most amount of head, and flexibility as far as which tank to use. All the tanks are independent from each other when it comes to use. When there is limited rain, I can still get the most head out of the system.

Original description; Four 250 gallon tanks plumbed together to get maximum head during catchment. Tanks serve and upper and lower garden. Just plumbed to catch as of now, need to complete the delivery system. Tanks set up next to a 750 gallon tank. 1750 gallons total collecting from a roof that gets 10,000 gallons a year on average.

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