Loading...

Tibet Oral History Project: Interview with Dolma (alias) on 5/20/2012

360 views

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Mar 9, 2018

The interpreter's English translation provided during this interview is potentially incomplete and/or inaccurate. If you are not fluent in Tibetan, please refer to the interview transcript for the complete and correct English translation. Read the interview transcript in English at http://tibetoralhistory.org/Interview... ** This interview about life in Tibet was conducted by the Tibet Oral History Project. This non-profit organization aims to preserve the history and culture of the Tibetan people by interviewing elderly Tibetan refugees about life in Tibet before and after the Chinese invasion. Learn more at http://www.TibetOralHistory.org. ** Interview Summary: Dolma is from Gonjo in Kham Province where she worked in the fields and grazed animals as a young girl. She recalls that no money was used and everyone produced their own food and clothing. She was fortunate to be taught a little reading and attempted a few times to run away to Lhasa with other village girls. Dolma married a trader from Amdo and they decided to go to Lhasa after he travelled to China and anticipated problems soon coming to Tibet. Dolma remembers the turmoil in Lhasa and the decision of her husband to join the Chushi Gangdrug Defend Tibet Volunteer Force to resist the Chinese onslaught. She recounts the horrifying experiences she underwent along with her one-year old son after her husband left. Dolma was arrested after the March 10th uprising in Lhasa and subjected to forced labor. She recalls stories of the prisons and many deaths and suicides as well as starvation due to severely limited rations. Dolma narrates how the Chinese caught her twice as she fled from her home in Lhasa. She talks about the experiences of being the wife of a "rebel" as the Chinese labeled her. Dolma briefly describes her third and final attempt to escape into Bhutan and her fortunate reunion with her husband.

Loading...

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...