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Tibet Oral History Project: Interview with Jangchuk Nyima (alias) on 5/15/2012

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Published on Mar 9, 2018

Interviewee requested that his face not be revealed.

** The interpreter's English translation provided during this interview is potentially incomplete and/or inaccurate. If you are not fluent in Tibetan, please refer to the interview transcript for the complete and correct English translation. Read the interview transcript in English at http://tibetoralhistory.org/Interview...

** This interview about life in Tibet was conducted by the Tibet Oral History Project. This non-profit organization aims to preserve the history and culture of the Tibetan people by interviewing elderly Tibetan refugees about life in Tibet before and after the Chinese invasion. Learn more at http://www.TibetOralHistory.org.

** Interview Summary: Jangchup Nyima's parents separated when he was a small child. He lived with his mother and herded animals. Both of his parents supported his wish to become a monk and offered to admit him in the local monastery when he became older, but the Chinese attacked his village when Jangchup Nyima was 11 years old. Jangchup Nyima describes how he and the people of his village fled to the mountains to escape being captured by Chinese soldiers. They hid for three years, suffering from starvation and inhospitable weather conditions. They continually moved from place to place and were pursued and attacked by Chinese troops. Jangchup Nyima recalls finally being captured and all the prisoners were sent to a village to join the commune system. He describes life in the commune which included strenuous field work and long meetings at night where one was forced to insult lamas and former village leaders. Food rations were too small and starvation and death was rampant until the mid-1960s. Jangchup Nyima's mother died after only one year and he became so weak he could hardly walk. Much later in life Jangchup Nyima fulfilled his wish to become a monk, travelling first on pilgrimage to Lhasa around 1995 and eventually to Dharamsala, India.

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