Upload

Loading...

How To Make Easy-Peeling Hard-Boiled Eggs - Perfect for Easter!

730,687

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Apr 11, 2012

UPDATE: For Easter, add 2 teaspoons of white vinegar to the water to help eggs color more evenly. Also, as a few of people have been reporting that their particular brand of eggs tend to crack when dropped into boiling water right out of the fridge, try leaving them on the counter for an hour or two to warm slightly before putting them in the water. This will help avoid cracking.

April 11, 2012 is our 9-year anniversary on the road! To celebrate, here's a non-RV-specific video. lol OK.... so this video isn't just for RVers, but it is a truly egg-cellent tip (sorry). :-P

Hard-boiled eggs are one of our favorite quick & healthy snacks, especially during a break from cruising down the highway. We also include them in our dinner salads on a regular basis, so we always keep them in the fridge. The only nuisance is how difficult it can sometimes be to remove the shell without removing a lot of the egg too. While boondocking (camping without hook-ups) we of course don't want to be using too much water, so we always hard boil a batch of eggs right before heading out into the wild for a week or two.

Since we hard-boil so many eggs, we've been searching for a trick to making them easy to peel. There are almost as many tips about this online as there are "sure-fire" methods for curing hiccoughs... and all of them about as worthwhile.

We've read about, and tried, an awful lot of techniques... "Use eggs that are near their expiration date"... "Use really fresh eggs"... "Let the eggs warm to room temperature before putting them in the boiling water"... "Put the eggs into cold water, then heat them to a boil slowly"... "Add vinegar to the water"...and variations on these themes, and others. None of them seem to work consistently.

About three months ago, we tried another method on our own that we hadn't read about anywhere, and it's turned out to be the most consistent technique we've ever used for making easy-to-peel hard-boiled eggs. It doesn't matter how old or new the eggs are. Just follow the simple steps in this video and see how you make out.

A few notes: First, we always buy extra-large eggs. If you use large eggs instead, our guess is that it might only take 12 minutes instead of 13. Or maybe not... try it out and let us know! Second, try to avoid hard-boiling any egg that has an obvious hairline crack in it, since it will be more likely to break when putting the cold egg into boiling water (you're not trying to make poached eggs here, right?). If you have problems with eggs cracking when putting them into the water, try leaving them on the counter for an hour or two to warm up to room temperature before putting them into the boiling water. And again, we never make hard-boiled eggs while boondocking due to the water it uses (although EATING them while boondocking is the best)! ;-)

One last quick trick: the absolute easiest way to peel the eggs is immediately after removing them from the ice. They will still peel nicely a day (or a week) later, but the shells will practically fall off if you peel them right after making them.

****************************************­**********************
DO YOUR RV SLIDE TOPPERS NEED REPLACING? Tough Top Awnings are thicker and stronger than OEM fabric and cost far less too! Get higher-quality fabric and save at least half the cost by replacing your slide toppers yourself. Watch RVgeeks' Slide Topper Installation Video to see how easy it is - http://youtu.be/7EXgaoRNkYg - and visit http://www.toughtopawnings.com for complete details. Be sure to tell Ray (the owner) "RVgeeks sent me!"

****************************************­**********************
RV Geeks offers basic DIY (do it yourself) RV service, repair, maintenance and travel tips from full-time RVers who have been handling most of their own maintenance since hitting the road in 2003.

Be sure to confirm that all methods and materials used are compatible with your particular recreational vehicle. Every type of motorhome, motorcoach, fifth wheel, travel trailer, bus conversion, camper and toy hauler is different, so your systems may not be the same as ours.

While we're not RV technicians, we're very mechanically inclined and have learned a lot about RV systems over the years. We handle most of our own minor service, maintenance and repair work on our 2005 43' Newmar Mountain Aire diesel pusher.

We meet lots of newer RVers who are eager to learn some basics about maintaining and caring for their rigs. After more than 10 years on the road, we want to share what we've learned (some of it the hard way). ;-)

We hope our experiences can help other RVers go DIY, saving some time, money and effort, while experiencing the satisfaction of a job well done.

We do not pretend to be experts on any particular RV topic, and mostly know about maintaining our own rig. But lots of things are the same on RVs in general, and diesel pushers in particular.

Comments welcome! Thanks for watching!

Loading...

Advertisement
When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up Next


Sign in to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...