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Malvinas/Falklands War How Close To Defeat?-part01

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Published on Mar 9, 2010

STRICTLY HISTORICAL PURPOSES ONLY

The Falklands War started on Friday, 2 April 1982 with the Argentine invasion and occupation of the Falkland Islands and South Georgia, and ended with the Argentine surrender on 14 June 1982. The war lasted 74 days, and resulted in the deaths of 255 British and 649 Argentine soldiers, sailors, and airmen, and three civilian Falklanders. It is the most recent conflict to be fought by the UK without any allied states and the only external Argentine war since the 1880s.

The conflict was the result of a protracted diplomatic confrontation regarding the sovereignty of the islands. Neither state officially declared war and the fighting was largely limited to the territories under dispute and the South Atlantic. The initial invasion was characterised by Argentina as the re-occupation of its own territory, and by the UK as an invasion of a British dependent territory.

Britain launched a naval task force to engage the Argentine Navy and Argentine Air Force, and retake the islands by amphibious assault. The British eventually prevailed and at the end of combat operations on 14 June the islands remained under British control. However, as of 2010 and as it has since the 19th century, Argentina shows no sign of relinquishing its claim. The claim remained in the Argentine constitution after its reformation in 1994.

The political effects of the war were strong in both countries. A wave of patriotic sentiment swept through both: the Argentine loss prompted even larger protests against the ruling military government, which hastened its downfall; in the United Kingdom, the government of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was bolstered. It helped Thatcher's government to victory in the 1983 general election, which prior to the war was seen as by no means certain. The war has played an important role in the culture of both countries, and has been the subject of several books, films, and songs. The cultural and political weight of the conflict has had less effect on the British public than on that of Argentina, where the war is still a topic of discussion.

Argentina

President Leopoldo Galtieri
Admiral Jorge Anaya
Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo
Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo
Brigadier-General Basilio Lami Dozo
Brigade-General Mario Menéndez
649 killed
1,068 wounded
11,313 taken prisoner
Losses:
1 cruiser
1 submarine
4 cargo vessels
2 patrol boats
1 spy trawler
25 helicopters
35 fighters
2 bombers
4 transports
25 COIN aircraft
9 armed trainers

United Kingdom

Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse
Rear-Admiral John Sandy Woodward
Major-General Jeremy Moore
Brigadier Julian Thompson
Commodore Michael Clapp
258 killed
777 wounded
115 taken prisoner
Losses:
2 destroyers
2 frigates
1 LSL landing ship
1 LCU amphibious craft
1 container ship
24 helicopters
10 fighters

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