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Bianca Jagger endorses Feed in tariff.

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Published on Aug 31, 2012

The Feed-in-tariff is the 9th wonder in the world.
The F.I.T. is a giant economic step forward for human kind.

PG&E is the enemy of California.

Obama and the Tax Cuts for the Wealthy::

As bad as Obama's failing to serve the 99%, both on jobs and on healthcare, the most glaring violation of his economic campaign promises was when he broke his campaign promise to let the tax cuts for the 1% expire.
This is such a flagrant violation of a campaign promise that it should have already undermined him with most of his 2008 supporters.  Political spin is truly creative, though, and Obama apologists, the Obama administration, along with a complicit media have constructed a false narrative that lets Obama off the hook.  The narrative in brief: Obama did his best but the Republicans forced him to break the promise.  This narrative is fiction but we need to examine it in detail to see why.
The public wanted the tax cuts to expire.  Buffett, the billionaire investor, wanted the government to raise taxes on the rich. Dozens of America's wealthiest taxpayers — including hedge fund legend Michael Steinhardt, super trial lawyer Guy Saperstein, and Ben Cohen of Ben & Jerry's fame —appealed to President Obama not to extend the Bush tax cuts for anyone earning more than $1 million a year. The opportunity for Obama to fulfill his campaign promise on taxes arose just before the elections of 2010.
Republican Senators dug in for a battle.  They told  Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid that they would shut down the Senate for all business until Obama agreed to the tax cuts.  Part of the business on the table was an extension of unemployment benefits to two million unemployed Americans whose unemployment insurance was set to expire at Christmas time.  The Republicans refused to extend these unemployment benefits unless Obama extended the tax cuts for the rich.
A serious showdown seemed imminent, though it was no more serious than a similar threat Bill Clinton had faced during his first term.
In 1995, Republicans wanted Clinton to sign a budget that included a lot of cuts for the 99%.  Clinton refused.  Republican House leader Dick Armey threatened to shut down the government unless Clinton agreed to the cuts.  Clinton refused, saying that he would never allow the Republican budget to become law even if his popularity dropped to 5% in the polls. Clinton won the face off. The Republicans came out looking like ideological zealots.  Clinton's poll numbers soared to the levels he enjoyed early in his presidency. And Clinton was re-elected.
Obama's situation was analogous to Clinton's but he was in a stronger position.  Americans supported extending the unemployment benefits and opposed extending the tax cut for the wealthy. Like Clinton, Obama was being portrayed as weak and spineless.  This was Obama's opportunity to turn the tables on the Republicans. Nancy Pelosi and the Democratic House had also dug in for the fight.  The House was prepared to stand firm on the unemployment insurance extension and end the tax cuts for the rich.  Clinton had created the game plan, executed it successfully, and now it was Obama's turn.
The Republicans held hostage the extension of unemployment benefits in order to force Obama to continue the tax cuts. The extension of unemployment insurance took stage center.  Obama could have appealed to the nation to support the extension of unemployment insurance for the unemployed. 
He had the oratorical skill and the facts to support him.  A Labor Department committee, appointed during the Bush Administration, concluded that unemployment insurance had already been an economic stabilizer during ongoing recession. 
Unemployment insurance payments had kept the GDP $315 higher than it would have been; prevented 1.8 million jobs being lost; and had provided an effective multiplier effect on the economy: "for every dollar spent on unemployment insurance, the report finds an increase in economic activity of two dollars."

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