Loading...

Why we need Constructive Elements in Journalism | Cathrine Gyldensted | TEDxDresden

2,343 views

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Nov 1, 2016

Is there an alternative to the day-to-day bombardment with bad news? In this truly inspiring and personal talk, Journalist Cathrine Gyldensted challenges the negatively biased paradigms of mainstream journalism and sets a remarkable counterpoint by introducing the powerful concept of “Constructive Journalism”. She demonstrates how she stepped out of the vicious circle of drama and negativity in the newsrooms by adding more constructive elements to her reporting. “Constructive Journalism” draws on concepts from positive psychology, moral psychology and prospective psychology and allows the spotlight to be put on the immense potential for constructive solutions within society.

Cathrine Gyldensted coined the term “Constructive Journalism” academically in 2015 (with Karen McIntyre) and is currently serving as the worlds first director of Constructive Journalism at Windesheim University, the Netherlands. While elaborating the concept academically and spreading the idea world-wide, Cathrine has also authored two books on Constructive Journalism: “From Mirrors to Movers. Five Elements of Constructive Journalism” (2015) and “Handbook of Constructive Journalism” (2014 – in Danish).

Between 2000 and 2011, she served as an investigative reporter, news reporter, radio anchor and executive producer at the Danish Broadcasting Corporation and at Radio24syv. Cathrine majored in Radio & Foreign Affairs at the Danish School of Journalism in Aarhus and holds a Master of Applied Positive Psychology from the University Of Pennsylvania.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Loading...

to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...