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JPEG vs RAW

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Published on Dec 26, 2010

A Discussion About JPEG vs RAW
http://waynerasku.com
What Is The Big Deal About JPEG or RAW?

One of the first things you should do before you take the first picture is to select the right file format. If you are using a digital SLR, you will have more choices than if you are shooting with a more basic digital camera.

The use of RAW formats has become much more widely accepted, however, there are still some photographers who do not know the difference between the two formats. And then there are those who know the difference and are strongly in favor of one or the other.

The goal of this post is to explain the difference between JPEG and RAW in a way that makes sense. In fact, the video is probably the best way for you to learn about both RAW and JPEG.

What is JPEG?

JPEG (also known as JPG) is The Standard digital format for graphic images produced by a digital camera. The camera uses software to process a digital image in-camera and produce a usable file that can be printed or posted on the Web. The processing of the image in the camera results in a "lossy compression" that discards certain unnecessary picture information in order to produce a picture with good quality and a smaller file size. Most digital images that are printed or saved to the Internet on website like Facebook are JPEG images.

What is RAW?

RAW is a non-standard format used by digital cameras to record the picture information of an image file. It records all the information about a photograph without any in-camera processing, and without any loss or compression of the image. RAW images must be "converted" to a format that is usable by print programs or web graphics, and in most cases, this will be a JPEG file format.

JPEG vs RAW

From the descriptions, it appears that RAW would be the best way to go. However, there are plenty of photographers who either don't know about RAW or who resist the transition to recording RAW images in their digital cameras. There are some rather compelling reasons for both choices.

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