Loading...

Langbein Lecture: H22A. The Soil Underfoot: Green Water and Global Food Security - 2012 Fall Meeting

1,439 views

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Dec 5, 2012

Langbein Lecture: H22A. The Soil Underfoot: Green Water and Global Food Security - 2012 AGU Fall Meeting

Abstract:

http://abstractsearch.agu.org/meeting...

Soils function in agricultural ecosystems as both provisioning and regulatory hydrologic agents through their impacts on evapotranspiration, runoff, and groundwater flow. Two-thirds of the world’s food supply is produced through the consumptive use of “green water,” the water entering soil by natural precipitation and remaining accessible to plants, while green water accounts for 85 % of all the water consumed globally by croplands. The ability of soils to provide adequate green water depends on their “natural capital” and on their resilience to land-use changes and the flows that link the global atmosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere, both of which now exhibit a variability that exceeds what has been characteristic of them during the past 10 millennia. Adding to this variability is the growing global food demand, which by mid-century will require a 30 to 50 % increase in the water now consumed annually for food production. Meeting this challenge to global food security will call on hydrologists to provide a much deeper quantitative understanding of how soils perform their provisioning and regulatory functions in the water cycle, how they respond to land-use changes, and how they mediate the global flows of matter and energy.

Cite as: Author(s) (2012), Title, Abstract H22A-04 presented at 2012 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 3-7 Dec.

Loading...

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...