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Science Summer Program Exposes Kids to the Gross, Mushy and Slimy

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Published on Aug 20, 2019

The GSK Science in the Summer program has a simple mission: “When summer is out, science is in.” Every year, the program partners with community organizations to provide access to science education during the summer. In a classroom in Marshall, Texas, the students are dissecting sheep hearts and learning about basic human anatomy.

“If you feel the urge to say ‘ew,’ ‘gross,’ correct yourself and say, ‘oh, interesting.’”

That’s Heather Kleiner, the Sponsored Programs Manager at Sci-Port Discovery Center, who is leading the class.

“The nation needs more scientists at every level. But diverse scientists, women, minorities, people of different abilities,” she says. “The goal here is increased appreciation for science, education and science careers.”

The program, which hosts learning opportunities across the country, partnered with the local Boys and Girls club in Marshall.

“One of the biggest barriers we know for people’s success in life is education, transportation and after-school care,” explains Chad Patterson, CEO Boys and Girls Club of The Big Pines. “We provide that safe nurturing place.”The GSK Science in the Summer program has a simple mission: “When summer is out, science is in.” Every year, the program partners with community organizations to provide access to science education during the summer. In a classroom in Marshall, Texas, the students are dissecting sheep hearts and learning about basic human anatomy.

“If you feel the urge to say ‘Ew!’ ‘Gross!’ correct yourself and say, ‘Oh, interesting.’”

That’s Heather Kleiner, the sponsored programs manager at Sci-Port Discovery Center, who is leading the class.

“The nation needs more scientists at every level. But diverse scientists, women, minorities, people of different abilities,” she says. “The goal here is increased appreciation for science, education, and science careers.”

The program, which hosts learning opportunities across the country, partnered with the local Boys and Girls Club in Marshall.

“One of the biggest barriers we know for people’s success in life is education, transportation and after-school care,” explains Chad Patterson, CEO Boys and Girls Club of The Big Pines. “We provide that safe nurturing place.”


Coverage of after-school learning opportunities is supported in part by a grant from the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, at www.mott.org. Education Week retains sole editorial control over the content of this coverage.

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