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Tibet Oral History Project: Interview with Tsering Kyipa on 7/1/2007

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Published on Jan 19, 2018

The interpreter's English translation provided during this interview is potentially incomplete and/or inaccurate. If you are not fluent in Tibetan, please refer to the interview transcript for the complete and correct English translation. Read the interview transcript in English at http://tibetoralhistory.org/Interview...

** This interview about life in Tibet was conducted by the Tibet Oral History Project. This non-profit organization aims to preserve the history and culture of the Tibetan people by interviewing elderly Tibetan refugees about life in Tibet before and after the Chinese invasion. Learn more at http://www.TibetOralHistory.org.

** Interview Summary: When Tsering Kyipa was a child, her parents gave her to a family in a place called Sha-Sima as an adopted daughter. Her adopted parents treated her very poorly and once she was accused of stealing the cash box. Unable to bear this difficult life, she ran away to her parents, but her mother once again gave her to a new family. Later, her parents forced her to marry. Tsering Kyipa and her husband worked on a road crew for the Chinese and later became farmers. Though Tsering Kyipa personally was not subjected to thamzing 'struggle sessions' because she belonged to the class the Chinese wanted to use for labor, she saw many others undergo thamzing. She fainted the first time she witnessed it and was able to warn several families to escape before they were taken for thamzing. Tsering Kyipa also witnessed the destruction of local monasteries. Tsering Kyipa's parents left for India after being informed they would be subjected to thamzing. She was unable to go with them because her husband was away. Later the Chinese allowed her to visit her parents in India so she is one of very few Tibetans with official travel documents. She returned to Tibet once before moving to India permanently.

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