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After Hurricane Sandy Good Samaritans help neighbors recover

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Published on Nov 2, 2012

After Hurricane Sandy Good Samaritans help neighbors recover

Hurricane Sandy was a tropical cyclone of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season that severely affected portions of the Caribbean, Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern United States in late October, with lesser impacts in the Southeastern and Midwestern states and eastern Canada. In diameter, it was the largest Atlantic hurricane on record, with winds spanning 1,100 miles (1,800 km).[3][4] The eighteenth tropical cyclone and named storm and tenth hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season, Sandy is estimated in early calculations to have caused damage of at least $20 billion (2012 USD).[5] Preliminary estimates of losses that include business interruption surpass $50 billion (2012 USD), which, if confirmed, would make it the second-costliest Atlantic hurricane in history,[6] behind only Hurricane Katrina.

Sandy developed from a tropical wave in the western Caribbean Sea on October 22. It became a tropical depression, quickly strengthened, and was upgraded to a tropical storm six hours later. Sandy moved slowly northward toward the Greater Antilles and gradually intensified. On October 24, Sandy was upgraded to a hurricane, shortly before making landfall in Jamaica. Upon moving farther north, Sandy re-entered water and made its second landfall in Cuba during the early morning of October 25 as a Category 2 hurricane. During the late evening of October 25, Sandy weakened to Category 1 strength; in the early hours of October 26, it headed north through the Bahamas.[7] Sandy began to show some characteristics of both tropical and extratropical cyclones on October 26.[8] Sandy briefly weakened to a tropical storm in the early morning hours of October 27, then restrengthened to a Category 1 hurricane later that morning. Just before 8 a.m. EDT on October 29, Sandy turned to the north-northwest and started to make its expected approach towards the U.S. coast. At 7 p.m. EDT that evening, Sandy was declared a post-tropical cyclone, while still maintaining Category 1 strength.[9] Sandy made its final landfall 5 miles (8.0 km) southwest of Atlantic City, New Jersey at about 8 p.m. EDT on October 29.[10]

In the United States, Hurricane Sandy affected at least 24 states, from Florida to New England, with tropical storm force winds stretching far inland and mountain snows in West Virginia. The cyclone brought a destructive storm surge to New York City on the evening of October 29, flooding numerous streets, tunnels and subway lines in Lower Manhattan, Staten Island, Coney Island, the Rockaways and other areas of the city and cutting off electricity to parts of the city and its suburbs, especially Zone A areas near waterways which were issued evacuation orders.[11] Severe damage occurred in New Jersey, especially in the communities along the Jersey Shore

A thousand mile stretch of the United States is facing the misery of superstorm Sandy's devastation Tuesday as millions along the U.S. East Coast faced life without power or mass transit for days, as the U.S. death toll climbed to at least 39.

Many of the victims were killed by falling trees, and rescue work continued a day after the storm made landfall in New Jersey on Monday evening.

Sandy hit with hurricane force and cut power to more than 8.2 million across the East and put the presidential campaign on hold just one week before Election Day. The cost of the damage caused by the storm is estimated to be around $20 billion.

The level of devastation at the Jersey Shore is unthinkable. Houses are moved off their foundations, there are houses in the middle of route 35.

New York was among the hardest hit, with its financial heart closed for a second day. The storm caused the worst damage in the 108-year history of the city's subway system, and there was no indication of when the largest U.S. transit system would be rolling again.
"This was a devastating storm, maybe the worst that we have ever experienced," New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said.

But the full extent of the damage in New Jersey was being revealed as morning arrived. Emergency crews fanned out to rescue hundreds.

A hoarse-voiced New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie gave bleak news at a morning news conference: Seaside rail lines washed away. No safe place on the state's barrier islands for him to land. Parts of the coast still under water.

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