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Michael O'Keefe - Predicting Vehicle Usage with Clojure

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Published on Jan 9, 2014

"Economy of Motion" (EOM) is an open-source work-in-progress vehicle energy-use simulator. I will discuss the motivation for the simulator, how Clojure's principles of simplicity were applied to reduce complexity in the underlying mathematical model, and present several examples that showcase how the simulation can be used to research vehicle energy consumption. An overview of how EOM works and the underlying theory will be briefly discussed along with specific comparisons to the ADVISOR (TM) advanced vehicle simulator, a tool that this author helped develop and currently administers as an open-source project.

Michael O'Keefe conducts modeling and simulation of engineering systems and develops engineering tools and simulators with emphasis on energy efficient buildings, advanced vehicles, and renewable energy systems. Michael has recently started his own company called ImagineMade whose goal is to reduce the complexity of modeling and simulation of energy intensive systems. Michael also works half time with Big Ladder Software, a Denver based small business that creates and supports open source software tools for designing and modeling energy efficient buildings. In his spare time, Michael administers the ADVISOR (TM) advanced vehicle simulator open-source project originally developed while he was at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Prior to working for Big Ladder, Michael worked for over 10 years at NREL, a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory located in Golden, Colorado. At NREL, Michael assisted in the modeling and simulation of advanced vehicles, developed metrics for vehicle driving profiles, and conducted research on power electronics cooling and reliability for electric vehicles. Prior to joining NREL, Michael worked briefly at Nippon Steel Corporation in Chiba, Japan and speaks Japanese fluently. Michael did his undergraduate work in Mechanical Engineering at Northern Arizona University and received his Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington.

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