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Te Deum Feast of All Saints--Domenico Scarlatti

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Published on Nov 1, 2008

The Feast of All Saints: November 1st

The Church gives us on this day a wonderful vision of heaven, showing us with St. John, the twelve thousand signed (twelve is considered a perfect number) of each tribe of Israel, and a great multitude which no one can count, of every nation and tribe, of every people and tongue, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes and with palms in their hands. Christ, our Lady, the blessed battalions distributed in nine choirs, the apostles and prophets, the martyrs crimsoned in their blood, the confessors adorned in white garments and the chaste choir of virgins form, as the hymn of Vespers sings, the majestic court. It is composed of all those who here below were detached from worldly riches, gentle, suffering, just, merciful, pure, peaceful and persecuted for the name of Jesus. "Rejoice, the Master had foretold them, for a great reward is prepared for you in heaven." Among those millions of the just who were faithful disciples of Jesus on earth, are several of our own family, relations, friends, members of our parochial family, now enjoying the fruit of their piety adoring the Lord, King of kings, and Crown of all Saints (Invitatory at Matins) and obtaining for us the wished for abundance of His mercies.

Te Deum:

The Te Deum was probably composed by St. Nicetas (335-415). In general, the Te Deum is said in the Office at the end of Matins whenever the Gloria in excelsis is said at Mass. This rule is sufficiently accurate for those who use the Roman Breviary. In addition to it's liturgical use, the Te Deum is used in many additional Liturgical functions as a hymn of thanksgiving on occasions of great solemnity, such as the election of a pope, the consecration of a bishop, the benediction of an abbot, canonization of a saint, religious professions, etc. The faithful who, to give thanks to God for blessings received, devoutly recite the Ambrosian hymn Te Deum laudamus are granted: an indulgence of 5 years.

The Te Deum is written in rhythmical prose. It consists of three distinct parts:

Part I contains a hymn of praise to the blessed Trinity; the praise of Earth and of the Angelic choirs; the praise of the Church Triumphant and of the Church Militant.

Part II is a hymn in praise of Christ, the Redeemer. It proclaims the glory of Christ, the eternal Son of the Father--His incarnation, victory over death, exaltation, future coming, and terminates with a prayer of supplication for those redeemed by the Precious Blood, that they may be numbered among the Saints.

Part III is composed principally of verses from the Psalms. It contains a prayer of petition for the divine assistance and guidance; a declaration of our fidelity; a prayer for deliverance from sin during the day about to begin; it closes with a prayer for mercy for those who have hoped in the Lord.



Please visit our website for the more information on:

The Litany of the Saints,

http://catholicharboroffaithandmorals...

Heaven,

http://catholicharboroffaithandmorals...

The Invocation of the Saints,

http://catholicharboroffaithandmorals...

The Veneration of the Saints,

http://catholicharboroffaithandmorals...

The Communion of Saints,

http://catholicharboroffaithandmorals...

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