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AIRFORCE LIST OF BANNED WORDS: BOY, GIRL ...

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Published on Mar 12, 2017

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https://patriotpost.us/posts/47897

Air Force: Words Like 'Boy' and 'Girl' Could Be Offensive

Todd Starnes

The Air Force fears that words like boy, girl, colonial and blacklist might offend people, according to an email sent to Airmen at Joint Base San Antonio. An outraged Airman sent me a copy of the email as evidence the military is still infected with Obama-era political correctness. The email included an attachment that listed a number of words and phrases that might be construed as offensive. Now, to be fair there were some legitimately offensive and racially charged words and phrases on the list. But also included on the list were the words boy and girl. The email was written by a senior Air Force leader and was sent to an untold number of personnel at Lackland Air Force Base. Airmen were advised to study a list of words and phrases that “may be construed offensive.” Here’s a partial list of the dubious words and phrases deemed troublesome by the Air Force:

Boy

Girl

You People

Colonial

Blacklist

Blackmail

Blackball

Sounds Greek to me

Blondes have more fun

Too many chiefs, not enough Indians

“Please be cognizant that such conduct is 100 percent zero tolerance in or outside of the work climate,” the email read.

Copyright Disclaimer: Citation of articles and authors in this report does not imply ownership. Works and images presented here fall under Fair Use Section 107 and are used for commentary on events deemed newsworthy. Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976 allows for fair use for purposes including criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Section 107 reads in part, "Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright."
https://www.copyright.gov/title17/92c...

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