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William T. Newsome, leading neuroscientist

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Published on Oct 30, 2015

Former Co-Chair, White House Initiative on Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN); Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and Professor of Neuroscience, Stanford University
Stetson University
Class of 1974, Physics

William Newsome is a leading researcher in systems and cognitive neuroscience and has made fundamental contributions to the understanding of neural mechanisms that underlie visual perception and simple forms of decision making. Currently, he is an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, director of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute, and Harman Family Provostial Professor at Stanford University. From 2013 to 2014, Newsome was co-chair of the National Institutes of Health working group that formed the scientific plan for the White House BRAIN Initiative, which has been characterized as the “moonshot” of the 21st century. Newsome is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a recipient of the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association, the Dan David Prize, the Karl Spencer Lashley Award of the American Philosophical Society, the Champalimaud Vision Award, the Pepose Award for the Study of Vision, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He serves on the scientific advisory boards of the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics and the Riken Brain Institute, on the McKnight Scholars Awards Selection Committee of the McKnight Endowment Fund for Neuroscience, and on the Committee on Human Rights of the National Academy of Sciences. He received a BS in physics from Stetson University and a PhD in biology from the California Institute of Technology.

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