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Julie Christie Tribute

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Published on May 27, 2010

Here is an ambiance song, chosen to enhance the exceptional beauty of English first-class actress Julie Christie.
Julie Christie was born in 1941 in Chabua, Assam, India, then part of the British Empire. Christie's father ran the tea plantation around which Christie grew up, and her mother was a painter. As a teenager, she played the role of the Dauphin in a school production of George Bernard Shaw's "Saint Joan". She later studied at the Central School of Speech and Drama before getting her big break in 1961 in a science fiction series on BBC television, "A for Andromeda". Christie's first major film role was in "The Fast Lady", a 1962 romantic comedy. She first gained notice as Liz, the friend and would-be lover of the eponymous "Billy Liar" (1963) played by Tom Courtenay. It was 1965 when Christie became known internationally. Schlesinger directed her in her breakthrough role, as the amoral model Diana Scott in "Darling". Christie appeared as Lara Antipova in David Lean's adaptation of Boris Pasternak's novel "Doctor Zhivago" (1965), one of the all-time box office hits, and as Daisy Battles in "Young Cassidy", co-directed by Jack Cardiff and John Ford. In 1966, the 25-year-old Christie was nominated for a BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role when she played a double role in François Truffaut's "Fahrenheit 451" and won the Academy Award for Best Actress and BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role for "Darling". Later, she played Thomas Hardy's heroine Bathsheba Everdene in Schlesinger's "Far from the Madding Crowd" (1967) and the lead character, Petulia Danner, (opposite George C. Scott) in Richard Lester's "Petulia" (1968). In the 1970s, Christie starred in smaller, but culturally significant films such as Robert Altman's western "McCabe & Mrs. Miller" (1971), with Warren Beatty, where her role as a brothel 'madam' gained her a second Best Actress Oscar nomination, "The Go-Between" (again with Alan Bates, 1971), "Don't Look Now" (1973), "Shampoo" (1975), Altman's classic "Nashville" (1975), "Demon Seed" (1977), and "Heaven Can Wait" (1978), again with Beatty. She moved to Hollywood during the decade, where she had a high-profile (1967-1974), but intermittent relationship with Warren Beatty who described her as "the most beautiful person I had ever known." Following the end of the relationship with Beatty, she returned to the United Kingdom, where she lived on a farm in Wales. Christie made fewer and fewer films in the 1980s. She had a major supporting role in Sidney Lumet's "Power" (1986). Christie appeared as Gertrude in Kenneth Branagh's "Hamlet". Her next critically acclaimed role was the unhappy wife in Alan Rudolph's comedy-drama "Afterglow", which gained her a third Oscar nomination. Christie made a brief appearance in "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban", playing Madam Rosmerta. That same year, she also appeared in two other high-profile films: Wolfgang Petersen's "Troy" and Marc Forster's "Finding Neverland", playing Kate Winslet's mother. The latter performance earned Christie a BAFTA nomination as supporting actress in film. Christie portrayed the female lead in "Away From Her", a film about a long-married Canadian couple coping with the wife's Alzheimer's disease. On December 5, 2007, Christie won the Best Actress Award from the National Board of Review for her performance. She also won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Drama, the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role and the Genie Award for Best Actress for the same film. On January 22, 2008, Christie received her fourth Oscar nomination for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role at the 80th Academy Awards. She is active in various causes, including animal rights, environmental protection, the anti-nuclear power movement and endangered peoples.
Enjoy Julie Christie's immarcescible beauty!

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