Loading...

Dana Andrews

19,092 views

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Apr 16, 2009

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.


A tribute to one of the most underrated and underappreciated actors of the 40s and 50s, Dana Andrews (1909-1992). He played many "average Joe" roles in his early career and was often the second male lead, the guy who "didn't get the girl", until he saw the opportunity to play the leading man in 20th Century Fox's production "Laura" (1944). While he knew it wouldn't be considered his greatest acting role, he knew that it would make him a star. A talented singer, he never used his real singing voice in films, keeping his vocal talents a secret, fearing that he would be typecast as a singer/actor and it would end his career. Interestingly enough, his contract was shared between Samuel Goldwyn and Fox, and this enabled him to go back and forth between studios and undoubtedly gave him opportunity to play a variety of roles. Film noir ("Laura", "Fallen Angel", "Boomerang!", "Where The Sidewalk Ends", "While The City Sleeps", "Daisy Kenyon"), dramas ("The Best Years Of Our Lives", My Foolish Heart", "I Want You"), musicals ("State Fair", "Up In Arms"), thrillers ("Night Of The Demon", "The Iron Curtain", "Beyond A Reasonable Doubt"), adventure ("Duel In The Jungle", "Elephant Walk"), war dramas ("A Wing And A Prayer", "Crash Dive", "The Purple Heart", "A Walk In The Sun", and "The Frogmen"), westerns ("The Westerner", "Belle Starr", "The Ox-Bow Incident", "Canyon Passage", "Comanche") and romantic comedy ("Ball Of Fire"). A New Year's baby, the son of a baptist minister, he was married twice (his first wife died), and had four children, one of whom died young in 1964. Alcohol was his vice and he spent years battling the disease until he finally beat it in the 70s and toured and lectured extensively on the dangers of alcoholism and drunk driving. He was president of the Screen Actors Guild from 1963 to 1965, and he went into semi-retirment from films in the 70s, making occasionally forays into television movies and a few big screen character roles. His final film was "Prince Jack" (1984). Alzheimer's disease struck him in his last years and he died in a nursing home of pnuemonia. Despite the high profile films he starred in early in his career, Andrews was never really given the credit he deserved. Certainly he was a handsome, talented and earthy leading man, but there was something else that set him apart, a kind of cynicism yet a kind of hopefulness, hardened but tender. He just seemed very natural and real, and I've never felt that he was just "acting". So here's a tribute to Dana, this wonderfully talented man who deserves the kind of following that most of his contemporaries have. Sarah Vaughn's "Star Eyes" sums up how I feel about him. Enjoy!

Loading...

Advertisement
When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...