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The Responsibility of the Academy to Illuminate the Truths and Lies of 9/11

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Published on Mar 7, 2011

A University class taught by Prof. Anthony J. Hall from McMaster University to Lethbridge University on March 2, 2011 using skype. The participants are listed in order of appearance:

Anthony J. Hall is a Professor at the University of Lethbridge (Alberta) where he is the Coordinator/Instructor of the interdisciplinary program of Globalization Studies. He received an Alberta Book Award in 2004 for "The American Empire and the Fourth World."

Joshua Blakeney is Dr. Hall's graduate student (MSc) and Media Coordinator of Globalization Studies at the University of Lethbridge. He is the recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship to study the origins of the Global War on Terror.

Niels Harrit is Professor Emeritus of Chemistry at the University of Copenhagen (Denmark) where he has conducted research on metal complexes and taught for over forty years. He is the lead scientist of the nine-author European, Australian and American peer reviewed study based on the discovery of millions of microscopic red gray chips in the World Trade Center dust. These chips were found to be unburned nanothermite, an ultra high tech incendiary explosive produced by the military which is capable of slicing through steel beams. He has delivered over 90 lectures across the world, including Sweden, Norway, England, Holland, Australia, Spain and the US. He is currently lecturing on evidence for controlled demolition of WTC Building 7 across Canada at five major institutions - University of British Columbia, University of Victoria, McMaster University, University of Western Ontario, and University of Toronto.

Graeme MacQueen is Professor Emeritus of the Religious Studies Department at McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario). He was one of the founders and directors of McMaster's Centre for Peace Studies, a founder and co-director of the Centre's War and Health programme committee, and was co-director of the three year Health of Children in War Zones project funded by Health Canada. The project was active in three war zones. With colleagues, he has expressed some of the principles utilized in the war and health work of the Centre for Peace Studies in Peace and Change (1997), British Medical Journal (1998), Medical Crossfire (2000) and The Lancet (2001).

Laurie Manwell is PhD candidate in behavioral neuroscience and toxicology at the University of Guelph and a BEd candidate in education at Wilfrid Laurier University (Waterloo). She has published research on the effects of drugs on learning, memory, and behaviour (Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behaviour), on information processing (Psychonomic Bulletin and Review), self-esteem, emotion, and motivation (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology), and cellular and molecular biology (Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology). She recently published an article on the social psychological implications of 9/11 for a special issue of American Behavioral Scientist (2010) including five other articles on State Crimes Against Democracy (SCADs) with colleagues from the US (Lance deHaven-Smith, Matthew Witt, Christopher Hinson) and Australia (Alexander Kouzmin, Kyme Thorne).

Michael Truscello is Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Mount Royal University (Calgary, Alberta). His research interests include digital media (software theory; free and open source software; rhetoric and science and technology; social media), post anarchism and alternative media.

Colin Salter is an Assistant Professor at McMaster University in Canada (Hamilton, Ontario). He has a broad interest in the dynamics of disputes including scientific and technological controversies, though he is more directly interested in those surrounding animal, environmental and/or social justice issues.

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