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Evelin Lindner: Dignity, Humiliation, Love, Hate, and Other Emotions

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Published on Oct 31, 2011

"The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Love, Hate, and Other Emotions" is a video clip that was recorded on October 30, 2011, in Portland, Oregon, USA, by Linda Hartling, for the World Dignity University initiative.
For Evelin Lindner, feelings of humiliation are "the nuclear bomb of the emotions." In her doctoral research, she analyzes how, during the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, were forced to "choose" between two "loves" in the service of cycles of humiliation. Her four-year doctoral research project in social psychology was titled "The Feeling of Being Humiliated: A Central Theme in Armed Conflicts. A Study of the Role of Humiliation in Somalia, and Rwanda/Burundi, Between the Warring Parties, and in Relation to Third Intervening Parties" (2000, University of Oslo).
In her second book, "Emotion and Conflict: How Human Rights Can Dignify Emotion and Help Us Wage Good Conflict" (2009), Lindner describes how realizing the promise of equality in dignity can help improve the human condition at all levels—from micro to meso to macro levels. This book uses a broad historical perspective that captures all of human history, from its hunter-gatherer origins to the promise of a globally united knowledge society in the future. It emphasizes the need to recognize and leave behind malign cultural, social, and psychological effects of the past. The book calls upon the world community, academics and lay people alike, to own up to the opportunities offered by increasing global interdependence. Please see more details on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin041.php.
She wrote, among others, in her "Emotion and Conflict" book (2009): "In Kenya, I heard stories of Hutu genocidaires who were in hiding and needed psychotherapy because they could not eat without seeing the small fingers of children on their plates. Many Hutus had been forced to kill their own families, their Tutsi spouses and Tutsi-looking children, to show their allegiance to the Hutu cause. Their love for the Hutu cause became pitted against their love for their family. After the genocide, they were alone, deprived of their beloved family-and the killers were none but themselves. The International Panel of Eminent Personalities confirms: "Hutu women married to Tutsi men were sometimes compelled to murder their Tutsi children to demonstrate their commitment to Hutu Power. The effect on these mothers is . . . beyond imagining."
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.

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