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Saturday Night And Sunday Morning (1960)

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Published on Mar 8, 2012

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

This is a video of the British film that is often regarded as the first "kitchen sink" and "angry young man" drama that came out of Britain in the 60s. Albert Finney, in his first starring role is Arthur Seaton, a young man in working-class Nottingham. By day, he slaves away in a dreary job at a local factory, while by night and weekend he drinks at the local pub, and womanizes, claiming to be anti-establishment. His reckless actions (he is having an affair with the factory foreman's wife Brenda, played by Rachel Roberts, but he takes a genuine interest in Doreen, played by Shirley Anne Field, who represents conformity), come back to haunt him when Brenda announces that she is pregnant with his child. After a beating by Brenda's brother and a fellow army cadet, Arthur has to decide what path he wants to take in life. While it's easy to think of Albert Finney as a shout, flush-faced character actor (my first memory of him was as Daddy Warbucks in "Annie" (1982)), it has often been overlooked that he was and is one of the most talented performers both on stage and on screen in the 1960s. This, along with "Tom Jones" (1963) ranks as one of his best early performances. The movie's theme also predates "Alfie!" (1966) by six years. The dreary, realistic life of the British working-class is excellently presented. The actual movie soundtrack is filmed with great jazz music, but I felt that "Pleasant Valley Sunday" by the Monkees (and written by Carole King) suited the footage. Enjoy!

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