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Papillary Thyroid Cancer | Symptoms, Treatments, and Prognosis for Papillary Thyroid Cancer

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Published on Aug 22, 2013

Papillary Thyroid Cancer | Symptoms, Treatments, and Prognosis for Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma, all about Papillary Thyroid Cancer.
VISIT: ►►► http://Papillary-ThyroidCancer.com ◄◄◄

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Papillary thyroid cancer (also sometimes called papillary thyroid carcinoma) is the most common type of thyroid cancer. You may have even heard your doctor talk about metastatic papillary thyroid cancer ("metastatic" means that it has spread beyond your thyroid gland). This article will focus on papillary thyroid cancer basics, including papillary thyroid cancer symptoms, treatments, and prognosis

Papillary thyroid carcinoma is the most common thyroid cancer. About 80% of all thyroid cancers cases are papillary thyroid cancer.1 What are some papillary thyroid cancer signs and symptoms? Papillary carcinoma typically arises as an irregular, solid or cystic mass that comes from otherwise normal thyroid tissue. This cancer has a high cure rate with 10-year survival rates for all patients with papillary thyroid cancer estimated at 80% to 90%. Cervical metastasis (spread to lymph nodes in the neck) are present in 50% of small papillary carcinomas and in more than 75% of the larger papillary thyroid carcinomas.

The presence of lymph node metastasis in these cervical areas causes a higher recurrence rate but not a higher mortality rate. Distant metastasis is uncommon, but lung and bone are the most common sites if the papillary carcinoma does spread. Tumors that invade or extend beyond the thyroid capsule have a much worse prognosis because of a high local recurrence rate.

But what do doctors look for to diagnose papillary thyroid cancer?

Characteristics of Papillary Thyroid Cancer

Peak onset ages are 30 to 50 years old.
Papillary thyroid cancer is more common in females than in males by a 3:1 ratio.
The prognosis directly related to tumor size. (Less than 1.5 cm [1/2 inch] is a good prognosis.)
This cancer accounts for 85% of thyroid cancers due to radiation exposure.
In more than 50% of cases, it spreads to lymph nodes of the neck.
Distant spread (to lungs or bones) is uncommon.
The overall cure rate is very high (near 100% for small lesions in young patients).

Although survival following papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is high, a small but significant number of recurrences and deaths occur decades after diagnosis, a long-term study has found.

The 3 most commonly cited studies on PTC have median follow-up times of 11, 15, and 15.7 years. In contrast, the new research reports on a median of 27 years of follow-up in a cohort of 269 PTC patients, said Raymon H. Grogan, MD, assistant professor of surgery and director of the endocrine surgery research program at the University of Chicago Medicine, Illinois. He presented the findings this week here at the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons 2013 Annual Meeting.

Papillary thyroid cancer (as is the case with follicular thyroid cancer) typically occurs in the middle aged with a peak incidence in the 3rd and 4th decades. It is more common in women with a F:M ratio of 1:1.6 - 3:1 2.

Papillary thyroid cancer, which is the most common type of thyroid cancer, makes up about 80% of all cases of thyroid cancer. It is one of the fastest growing cancer types with over 20,000 new cases a year. In fact, it is the 8th most common cancer among women overall and the most common cancer in women younger than 25.

Most Patients Survive Papillary Thyroid Cancer Regardless of Treatment

According to a study reported on in the May, 2010 issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, papillary thyroid cancer that has not spread outside the thyroid gland has a generally favorable outcome for patients, whether or not they receive treatment within a year of diagnosis.
According to the study author, "...nearly every thyroid gland might be found to have a cancer if examined closely enough. The advent of ultrasonography and fine-needle aspiration biopsy has allowed many previously undetected cancers to be identified, changing the epidemiology of the disease. Over the past 30 years, the detected incidence of thyroid cancer has increased three-fold, the entire increase attributable to papillary
thyroid cancer and 87% of the increase attributable to tumors measuring less than 2 centimeters."

Although survival following papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is high, a small but significant number of recurrences and deaths occur decades after diagnosis, a long-term study has found.

"Papillary thyroid cancer in general has a very good prognosis... Also, papillary thyroid cancer rates have been rising steadily for several decades worldwide. The combination of these 2 factors means that more and more people will be living with [the diagnosis] for several decades. This is why we think our study is important," Dr. Grogan told Medscape Medical News.

Papillary Thyroid Cancer
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