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Tibet Oral History Project: Interview with Naljorma Jangchup Palmo on 7/7/2013

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Published on Feb 16, 2018

The interpreter's English translation provided during this interview is potentially incomplete and/or inaccurate. If you are not fluent in Tibetan, please refer to the interview transcript for the complete and correct English translation. Read the interview transcript in English at http://tibetoralhistory.org/Interview...

** This interview about life in Tibet was conducted by the Tibet Oral History Project. This non-profit organization aims to preserve the history and culture of the Tibetan people by interviewing elderly Tibetan refugees about life in Tibet before and after the Chinese invasion. Learn more at http://www.TibetOralHistory.org.

** Interview Summary: Naljorma Jangchup Palmo was born in Jang Namru to a wealthy and influential family. Her father was the leader of the village. She remembers fondly visiting their monastery every winter which was six days away on horseback. During the summer, her family hosted the monks in their home and there was a horse race every year. At the age of 13 Naljorma Jangchup Palmo's family sponsored a special series of Buddhist teachings and required her to listen to them daily for three months. She explains about her unique nature and interest in Buddhism from a very young age. Naljorma Jangchup Palmo describes visiting Lhasa at the age of 14 and her first experience with the Chinese. She notes their initial attempt to win over aristocrats and other influential Tibetans with dhayen 'Chinese silver coins,' but later came a change in attitude as the Chinese began arresting and subjecting the leaders and the influential people to thamzing 'struggle sessions.' After receiving the news that the Chinese had occupied Lhasa, her father led the entire village in a vain attempt to flee. Her father was killed by the Chinese and Naljorma Jangchup Palmo was shot several times by the Chinese and detained. She describes another foiled escape that resulted in the death of more family members and finally her successful third attempt. She then practiced the Buddhist dharma at Mt. Kailash for several years and learned to forgive the Chinese.

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