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Tom Lehrer National Brotherhood Week Lyrics and Chords

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Uploaded on Mar 14, 2009

More videos from Trevor RIDVIDD http://www.youtube.com/user/7779trevor
Oh, the white folks hate the black folks
And the black folks hate the white folks
To hate all but the right folks
Is an old established rule

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But during National Brotherhood Week
National Brotherhood Week
Lena Horne and Sheriff Clark
Are dancing cheek to cheek
It's fun to eulogize
The people you despise
As long as you don't let 'em in your school

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Oh, the poor folks hate the rich folks
And the rich folks hate the poor folks
All of my folks hate all of your folks
It's American as apple pie

But during National Brotherhood Week
National Brotherhood Week
New Yorkers love the Puerto Ricans
'Cause it's very chic
Step up and shake the hand
Of someone you can't stand
You can tolerate him if you try

Oh, the Protestants hate the Catholics
And the Catholics hate the Protestants
And the Hindus hate the Moslems
And everybody hates the Jews

But during National Brotherhood Week
National Brotherhood Week
It's National Everyone-Smile-At-
One-Another-hood Week
Be nice to people who
Are inferior to you
It's only for a week, so have no fear
Be grateful that it doesn't last all year!

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Thomas Andrew "Tom" Lehrer (born April 9, 1928) is an American singer-songwriter, satirist, pianist, and mathematician. He has lectured on mathematics and musical theater. Lehrer is best known for the pithy, humorous songs he recorded in the 1950s and 60s.

His work often parodied popular song forms, notably in "The Elements", where he sets the names of the chemical elements to the tune of the "Major-General's Song" from Gilbert and Sullivan's Pirates of Penzance. Lehrer's earlier work frequently dealt with trivial subject matter, but he also produced a number of songs dealing with the social and political issues of the day, particularly when he went on to write for the US version of the TV show That Was The Week That Was.
Born in 1928 to a Jewish-American family, Tom Lehrer began studying classical piano music at the age of 7. However, Lehrer was more interested in the popular music of the age. Eventually, his mother found him a popular-music piano teacher.[1] At this early age, he began writing his own show tunes that would eventually help him in his future adventures as a satirical composer/writer in his years at Harvard and beyond.[2]

Before attending college, Lehrer graduated from the Loomis Chaffee School in Windsor, Connecticut. As an undergraduate student at Harvard University, studying mathematics, he began to write comic songs to entertain his friends, including "Fight Fiercely, Harvard" (1945). Those songs later became The Physical Revue, a joking reference to a leading scientific journal, The Physical Review.
Early life

Born in 1928 to a Jewish-American family, Tom Lehrer began studying classical piano music at the age of 7. However, Lehrer was more interested in the popular music of the age. Eventually, his mother found him a popular-music piano teacher.[1] At this early age, he began writing his own show tunes that would eventually help him in his future adventures as a satirical composer/writer in his years at Harvard and beyond.[2]
The National Conference for Community and Justice (NCCJ) formerly known as the National Conference of Christians and Jews, is a national non-profit organization in the United States, founded in 1927. Its objectives include fighting bias, bigotry and racism, and promoting harmony between different groups, especially those separated by cultural features such as race and religion.
NCCJ once sponsored a week-long National Brotherhood Week, held generally during the third week of February from the 1940s through the 1980s. The assassination of Malcolm X on the first day of National Brotherhood Week in 1965 inspired the Tom Lehrer song "National Brotherhood Week," satirizing race and other community relations in the United States.

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