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Bach, Prelude 20, Well-Tempered Clavier, Book II, A minor, BWV 889

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Published on Jan 12, 2010

FAQ

Prelude 20 in A minor from Book II of J. S. Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier, performed on the Roland VP-550 Vocal and Ensemble Keyboard by Stephen Malinowski, accompanied by scrolling music notation and bar-graph score.

Q: Where can I get the sheet music for this piece?
A: Here:
http://www.musanim.com/pdf/wtc2p20.pdf

Q: What are we hearing and how did you create it?
A: The voice-like sounds you're hearing are made by me singing and playing through the Roland VP-550 Vocal & Ensemble Keyboard, which is a vocoder that's been enhanced to make its output sound more like singers; here's an article on vocoders:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vocoder
If you want to see what it looks like when a person is performing with a vocoder, I highly recommend Don Lewis's performance of Swing Low, Sweet Chariot:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TdQwO...
The main difference between what Don's doing and what I did is that I performed each voice separately.

Q: Is there a way I could make the bar-graph scores myself?
A: The Music Animation Machine MIDI file player will generate this display; you can get the (Windows) software here:
http://www.musanim.com/player/
There are lots of places on the web where you can get MIDI files; I usually go to the Classical Archives site first:
http://www.classicalarchives.com/

Q: Could you please do a MAM video of _________?
A: First, check my "to do" list:
http://www.musanim.com/all/MAMToDoLis... ...
If the piece isn't listed, read the "Could you please do a MAM video of _________?" item on my main FAQ:
http://www.musanim.com/mam/mamfaq.htm... ...
and if you think I'd consider doing it, email me (stephen at musanim dot com).

Q: Why do the scores move at different speeds?
A: The bar-graph score is graphical, and in it, time translates exactly into horizontal position; conventional notation is symbolic, so there is usually one symbol per note, regardless of whether it's a long or a short note, and the symbols are more or less evenly spaced (for legibility); so, when the notes are faster, the notation needs to move faster to keep up.
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