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How to draw resonance structures (44)

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Uploaded on Oct 9, 2008

Organic chemistry: How to use curved ("electron-pushing") arrows to draw resonance structures.

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(1) Intro
(2) Intro: The meaning of resonance
(3) Intro: legal vs. illegal structures; the purpose of drawing resonance structures is to identify where the charges are
(4) Intro: more significant vs. less significant structures
(5) Intro: "more significant", "less significant", "insignificant"
(6) Intro: Why is it so important to know where the charges are?
(7) Intro: Why is it important to know where the charges are, continued.
(8) How to draw resonance structures when you are given a single electron-pushing arrow: lone pair to pi bond
(9) Lone pair to pi bond, continued
(10) Lone pair to pi bond, continued
(11) How to draw resonance structures when you are given a single electron-pushing arrow: pi bond to lone pair
(12) Pi bond to lone pair, continued
(13) How to draw resonance structures when you are given a single electron-pushing arrow: pi bond to pi bond
(14) Pi bond to pi bond, continued
(15) Summary and review
(16) How to draw resonance structures when you are given two electron-pushing arrows
(17) Given two electron-pushing arrows, continued
(18) Given two electron-pushing arrows
(19) Given two electron-pushing arrows
(20) Given two electron-pushing arrows
(21) Summary and review
(22) How to draw resonance structures when you are given multiple electron-pushing arrows
(23) Given multiple electron-pushing arrows, continued
(24) Given multiple electron-pushing arrows, continued
(25) Given multiple electron-pushing arrows, continued
(26) Given multiple electron-pushing arrows, continued
(27) Given multiple electron-pushing arrows--cycles of arrows
(28) Given multiple electron-pushing arrows--cycles of arrows
(29) How to draw resonance structures when you're given electron-pushing arrows--triple bonds
(30) How to identify atoms which are candidates for resonance
(31) Candidates for resonance, continued
(32) Using "candidates for resonance" to detect illegal arrows
(33) Candidates for resonance: elements that can exceed an octet
(34) "Owning", "sharing", and "lacking" electron pairs
(35) Don't draw "lone pair to lone pair" transitions
(36) The "as close as possible" principle
(37) The "as close as possible" principle
(38) The "as close as possible" principle
(39) Don't break sigma bonds!
(40) Don't exceed an octet. But you don't need to worry that "pi bond to lone pair" transitions will exceed an octet.
(41) The most important rule: To avoid exceeding an octet, any new pi bond must be formed either with a carbocation, or with an atom that's also losing a pi bond.
(42) The most important rule, continued
(43) The most important rule, continued
(44) The most important rule, continued
(45) The most important rule, continued
(46) The most important rule: summary and review; elements in 3rd period and below
(47) Don't draw resonance structures with more than two charges
(48) Don't draw resonance structures with more than two charges, continued
(49) The two good reasons for moving a pi bond into a lone pair
(50) The two good reasons for moving a pi bond into a lone pair, continued


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