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Dusting Troops with Pesticides US Army Medical Service Corps 1950s

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Published on Jun 24, 2009

This clip is from an episode of the US Army television series, The Big Picture, from the 1950s. In the 1950s, the Army investigated the use of pesticides on troops to control pests, such as ticks. For example, a 1959 pilot study to determine the safe use of malathion powder when dusted on troops. During the entire study, consisting of eight complete cutaneous dustings in a 15-day period, there was no significant cholinesterase depression which could be ascribed to the malathion and there was no evidence of toxicity as determined by daily examination of the men. Discomfort seemed to arise from the restriction of showers while wearing the same clothes for a prolonged period of time. However, several men noted that the powder actually helped them tolerate the no-bathing period by absorbing the perspiration; they would have welcomed any
absorbent powder during this time. Apparently the powder, which is almost
odorless, had no effect on other nonexposed volunteers who slept and lived in the same barracks as the dusted volunteers. One volunteer went to a dance wearing the dusted fatigues and seemingly had no difficulty getting dancing partners. Read the entire study at http://www.dtic.mil/cgibin/GetTRDoc?A...

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