Loading...

Israel :Start up Nation,growth comes at a cost

3,660 views

Loading...

Loading...

Transcript

The interactive transcript could not be loaded.

Loading...

Loading...

Rating is available when the video has been rented.
This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.
Published on Jan 18, 2010

Like other nations, Israel faces severe environmental problems today. Among the more important reasons are some positive factors that Israel hopes will continue: rapid population growth; rapid industrialization; and increased affluence which has resulted in a sharp increase in the use of automobiles and other consumer goods. In addition, environmental concerns were largely ignored for many years because of the need to consider security as a top priority.

http://www.jewishveg.com/schwartz/env...

Many cities, such as Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, and Haifa, and industrial centers such as Ashdod, face severe air pollution problems, primarily from industrial and auto emissions. There were 300 violations of air pollution standards in Tel Aviv alone in 1996. After the IUED publicized the high air pollution readings in Tel Aviv that they had measured, a special Knesset meeting was called to discuss the issue. Professor Menachem Luria, Chair of Hebrew University's Environmental Science Department, has stated that if current trends continue, some aspects of the air quality in Jerusalem could be as bad as that in Mexico City by 2010. A symposium that IUED sponsored on the issues was titled, "Don't Take a Breath - Urban Air Pollution". While many air pollutants have been increasing sharply. there has been a decrease in sulfur oxide emissions due to a shift to low sulfur coal, and lead emissions due to a reduction of the lead content of gasoline. The sharp increase in vehicle density from 34 cars per thousand people in 1954 to over 230 in 1993 constitutes an ever-growing threat to Israel's air quality

The Islamic laws - or shari'aa - and incidentally stem from a word meaning the sharing of water-, of which many Arab countries based their water use rules- predates the Mohammedan belief and is based on the harsh rules of the desert: example the people who dig a well have the first right of use, but they cannot deny the use - for drinking - to man or beast. A man lowering a container into a well will have full possession of only the amount of water that fills it at that precise moment...and so on. When it came to sharing water courses, the situation is not clear.

The fiscal growth enjoyed by Israel over the course of the last three years not only did nothing to diminish the gap between the poor and the wealthy, it in fact only deepened the inequality, so says a comprehensive fiscal report published Sunday by the Adva Center, a policy analysis institute focused on equality and social justice issues.

Currently there are more than 6,000 millionaires living in Israel, with a combined estimated fortune of $22 billion.

http://www.mideastnews.com/WaterWars.htm

Because of the Jordan's catastrophic reduction in flows -- from a historic level of 1.3 billion cubic meters annually to only about 70,000 cubic meters now -- the surface area of the Dead Sea has shrunk by a third in the past 50 years and the level of the sea, the world's lowest point, is dropping by a meter a year. Rather than tackling the root problem destroying the river and draining the Dead Sea -- which would require restoring flows to the Jordan -- the World Bank, supported by Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinian Authority, is throwing its weight behind a huge public works project that could easily cost $5 billion to $10 billion and will likely have damaging ecological consequences.

http://www.alternet.org/water/100057/...

Both Jordan and Israel, as well as many other countries in the region, are considering desalination of seawater as a viable solution to a water problem that as gone from chronic to acute. Jordans water problem is much more serious that Israels, and even as far back as the late 1990s the daily water allotment per family was only 22 gallons per day, as compared to 65 gallons per household in Saudi Arabia and 78 gallons per household in Israel.

http://www.theglobaleducationproject....

...desalination efforts... high energy and large costs... limited to cash and energy rich oil-exporting countries such as Oman .

  • Category

  • License

    • Standard YouTube License

Loading...

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Up next


to add this to Watch Later

Add to

Loading playlists...